We lose an hour of sleep this weekend as Daylight Saving Time kicks in on March 12. -File photo

Looking forward to Daylight Savings Time

Preparing for Daylight Savings Time may not save you any sleep, but it does save worry

As Canadians prepare for the Daylight Saving Time switchover on March 12, firefighters are reminding the public to check their safety sensors.

The twice-yearly switch — forward in the spring, back in the fall — is a great time to keep your family and home safe by ensuring your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are functioning, and replace and recycle their batteries.

ICBC has also put out a reminder, asking drivers to get some extra rest this weekend to prepare for the shift to DST.

Losing an hour of sleep may affect a driver’s alertness and reaction time, so ICBC is suggesting you plan to get to bed early on Saturday night and at your regular time on Sunday to be ready for the monday commute.

With more daylight during the late afternoon and early evening commutes comes darker mornings. So its also important for drivers to be aware of the changes in visibiity and variable weather conditions as winter turns to spring. The shift may mean that you’re now driving home in brighter conditions, so make sure you have a pair of sunglasses in the car, and watch for more bike riders, motorcyclists and pedestrians on the road as the weather improves.

You should also have a look around your home to prepare it for the start of Daylight Saving Time.

Start by turning your clocks forward. That might seem a little anachronistic as many digital clocks and smartphones automatically adjust, but don’t forget to change the clocks on your appliances (stoves, microwaves, etc.), coffee machines, watches, and of course, the good old-fashioned battery-powered clocks. This is also the perfect time to replace their batteries, allowing them to keep time accurately all year long.

Prepare for emergencies. With the rainy spring season on the way, you never know when a storm might knock your power out. Make sure your flashlights are stocked with working batteries and backups so that you’re prepared for anything.

Once you have finished your spring cleaning, take your used battery collection to be recycled. Properly disposing of used batteries has a positive impact on the environment by keeping them out of landfills.

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