Opinion

Canada Post should look to baby boomers for salvation

It was inevitable.

With the majority of Canadians plugged into the World Wide Web for entertainment and more importantly for communication, the need for a postal system to deliver birthday cards, Christmas cards and even love letters has dropped dramatically over the last decade.

The only person still getting a ton of snail mail is Santa Claus.

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers, as expected, is steadfastedly opposing the proposed plans to trim the postal workforce as well as eliminating home delivery in urban areas.

But the writing has been on the wall for a long time, and rather than trying to adapt to the declining use of the postal service, the union dug in their heels.

In this quarter alone, Canada Post revenues dropped by $73 million compared to the same quarter in 2012.

Anectdotal evidence suggests service has also taken a similar route.

There are many examples around the world of postal services that have redefined themselves into solvency and relevance.  Perhaps the  Canada Post and CUPW intelligentsia should take their heads out of the mail bag and have a look around.

In the meantime, the CUPW should embark on an advertising campaign aimed at baby boomers.

A 2011 census noted that 29 per cent of the population of Canada were baby boomers.

That’s about 10 million people who grew up writing letters, but stopped with the advent of the Internet.

Just think of what could be accomplished if they started a letter-writing campaign.

 

 

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