Opinion

Editorial: Science is good, but only when it suits the government

Two weights, two measures.

Whichever is more convenient.

At least that is how it seems Prime Minister Stephen Harper deals with science, scientists and their advice.

What other explanation can there be for Harper saying, in a CBC interview, in reference to parents who for various reasons do not allow their children to receive immunization shots, “it’s a tragedy when people start to go off on their own theories and not listen to scientific evidence.”

Let’s take a pause to let that bit of irony sink in.

Harper has consistently worked to eliminate or, at minimum, impede the development of scientific research, eliminate the objectivity of science from any debate by muzzling scientists, cutting budgets and just plain ignoring their findings and advice.

Facts can be problematic, a nuisance, a hinderance, especially when he has an agenda and the only thing between Harper and the realization of his agenda is science.

Unless of course the facts support his agenda.

Knowledge of our environment, and the deplorable condition it is in, is particularly troubling for Harper’s agenda.

So gone is most of the funding for Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans, as well as for the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory, and the Experimental Lakes Area.

If we don’t know how mismanaged and mistreated the environment is, then we won’t have to lie awake worrying.

Thanks, Stephen.

 

 

 

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

You might like ...

Wolf kill last hope for BC caribou herds
 
Hippie science is easy, and wrong
 
Community Market organizer sues Downtown Penticton Association
THIS & THAT: Letter turns into 40-year friendship for Penticton woman and Clifford writer
 
Legendary skater Toller Cranston dead at 65
 
Nelson’s oldest citizen passes
COLUMN: Accidental Kootenay time capsules unearthed
 
Helpers in the snow get plenty of hugs
 
The Globe and Mail profiles Nelson

Community Events, January 2015

Add an Event

Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Jan 23 edition online now. Browse the archives.