Summerland company boosts energy savings in Arctic homes

A prototype house, using energy efficiency technology developed in Summerland, has been designed for the Northwest Territories.

Pat Dheilly

A prototype house, using energy efficiency technology developed in Summerland, has been designed for the Northwest Territories.

ElectroMotion Energy, a Summerland-based company, designed and assembled an 84 square metre home to be built in Arctic communities.

The home design uses ElectroMotion’s patented Revolution technology.

The Revolution replaces traditional heating, cooling and hot water systems with one complete unit that also generates electricity. This also provides backup heat and power to the home.

Jai Zachary, president of ElectroMotion, said the home will result in energy saving of 30 to 70 per cent.

“It pays for itself in 25 to 30 years because of the energy efficiency,” he said.

At present, the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation has a backlog of providing 2,300 homes.

Zachary said the home can be erected by unskilled workers in less than a week.

Six of the houses will be built in Paulatuk, a community of around 300 people, north of the Arctic Circle.

“This is a great market for us,” Zachary said. “It’s such a perfect match.”

He said figures from the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation show a total cost of $1.4 million for a house and utilities over its 25- to 30-year lifespan.

The Revolution house costs roughly half that amount, and results in significant savings in energy costs.

According to information from the Northwest Territories, energy costs in Paulatuk are estimated at $1,000 a month.

Zachary said the technology and design used for the Arctic climate could work in other areas as well.

“Even though we’ve developed this for the harsh environment up north, for down here, it’s very applicable as well,” he said.

The Revolution technology is now in its seventh generation.

 

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