This is the James R. Doherty ice house, originally located at the west end of Denike Street in Prairie Valley. Prior to the invention of the refrigerator, ice houses were used to store ice. Ice was protected by the insulating properties of straw and sawdust. The District of Summerland leased out ice on the Trout Creek Reservoir at a rate of 20 cents per ton. The District also determined the selling price: $1.15 per ton to Summerland customers. The ice had to be at least 12 inches thick before harvesting. For most years, Robert Mitchell (1861-1949) was awarded the contract. To the right of the ice house is Doherty’s fruit sprayer. (Photo courtesy of the Doherty family)

This is the James R. Doherty ice house, originally located at the west end of Denike Street in Prairie Valley. Prior to the invention of the refrigerator, ice houses were used to store ice. Ice was protected by the insulating properties of straw and sawdust. The District of Summerland leased out ice on the Trout Creek Reservoir at a rate of 20 cents per ton. The District also determined the selling price: $1.15 per ton to Summerland customers. The ice had to be at least 12 inches thick before harvesting. For most years, Robert Mitchell (1861-1949) was awarded the contract. To the right of the ice house is Doherty’s fruit sprayer. (Photo courtesy of the Doherty family)

Ice was once harvested in Summerland

Before refrigeration, ice was collected and sold to customers

Ice harvesting was once an important service in Summerland.

Before refrigeration, ice was harvested from the Trout Creek Reservoir, in the Trout Creek Canyon and from surrounding lakes. The cut ice was then stored in ice houses, where it was covered with straw or sawdust in order to reduce melting.

READ ALSO: Ice was once harvested in Summerland

The James R. Doherty ice house was originally at the west end of Denike Street.

Summerland leased out ice on the Trout Creek Reservoir at a rate of 20 cents per ton. The ice was sold at $1.15 per ton to Summerland customers.

Ice had to be at least 30 centimetres or 12 inches thick before harvesting.

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