Heather Pascada has invented a six foot candy chute that keep trick or treaters safe and let the Halloween fun in Summerland's Trout Creek continue. (Peskelly Family Facebook page)

Okanagan Halloween house invents huge candy chute

The six foot chute looks like the snake from Nightmare Before Christmas

One of Okanagan’s biggest Halloween houses wasn’t going to let COVID-19 ruin the fun — so they did something about it.

Heather Pescada lives for Halloween and her famous Peskelly Family skeletons have been delighting children and adults alike for years now.

That’s why she knew she had to create some kind of candy chute that would allow trick or treaters to visit safely to her decked out and haunted yard in Trout Creek, Summerland.

“The candy chute is six feet of PVC pipe that I painted to look like the snake in Nightmare Before Christmas,” she said. Longtime friend Laurel Boothe will be standing on the top of the ladder sending candy down the chute. Trick or treaters will be at the bottom of the chute with their candy bag or basket waiting.

Heather will be making sure kids go in their own bubble, and in small groups through the haunted lawn and to the candy chute.

This creative sign explains how the chute works at the Peskelly Family haunted house in Trout Creek, Summerland.

“It’s going to be great. We have a little maze where they go through a graveyard, then to see the skeletons. There will be a projection screen of them dancing,” she said. “There is also a witches area and a Nightmare Before Christmas themed area.”

She has also added an interesting scene at her top window for people to look out for.

READ MORE: Summerland skeletons carry COVID safe message

“I look forward to Halloween starting way back in the summer, so I’m busy putting the final touches on everything,” she said.

Trout Creek is normally a hot spot for trick or treaters who come from afar and love going to the lakefront mansions for large chocolate bars and to check out Pescada’s house.

Each day of October, Pescada and her family create a scene of the Peskelly family skeletons. They dress them up, doing different activities on the front lawn. The skeletons have been to a concert, got a COVID test, played poker, gone fishing to washing the family car. The Peskellys even go on road trips around town, riding in the back of a police vehicle and fire trucks. Students from nearby Trout Creek Elementary often walk over to see what the skeletons are up to.

Everyday is different in the lead up to the big night, Hallow’s Eve.

She got her skeletons and ghouls to test out the chute, and from what she can see, it looks like the Peskelly skeletons will be doing the tricks to give the kids the treats.

The Peskelly skeletons are located in Trout Creek on Nixon Road.



monique.Tamminga@pentictonwesternnews.com

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