Road show hunting for unique items

Ever wondered just how much that family heirloom gathering dust in the attic is really worth? Is it little more than a trinket or at best a collectable or could it be...

Expert Rob Viereck of the Canadian Collectors Roadshow examines a piece of jewellery at the Penticton Ramada Inn and Suites this week. People are invited to bring in a wide variety of goods for a free appraisal or to sell.

Expert Rob Viereck of the Canadian Collectors Roadshow examines a piece of jewellery at the Penticton Ramada Inn and Suites this week. People are invited to bring in a wide variety of goods for a free appraisal or to sell.

Ever wondered just how much that family heirloom gathering dust in the attic is really worth? Is it little more than a trinket or at best a collectable or could it be…

Penticton residents will have a chance this week at the Ramada Inn and Suites to finally get a definitive answer about the value of a wide range of pieces thanks to the knowledgeable experts traveling with the Canadian Collectors Roadshow which is here until Saturday. And even if the free, no-appointment service doesn’t uncover the big-ticket item visitors can still pocket some fast cash from the group which represents thousands of collectors. Precious metals like gold, silver and platinum, coins and paper money, war items and more may be purchased on the spot.

“We haven’t exactly seen the Holy Grail just yet but I did buy a Victorian dress sword from a lady today that was worth a couple of hundred dollars,” said antique expert Mark Pender. “It was from around 1870 to 1880 and the lady said her mother used to wear it when she was highland dancing.”

Michael Ocher, 90, was another satisfied customer walking out the door of the Ramada this week.

“I had a few items I wanted to sell, a couple of watches so this is really a good idea,” he said with cheque in hand.

Pender described the show as: “A bit like Christmas everyday.”

However he stressed every once in a while that one unique item will surface similar to what happened during a recent Roadshow stop in Nanaimo on Vancouver Island.

A water colour painting by a popular Scottish artist came across his desk with what Pender determined to be a value of between $25,000-$50,000.

“There were big smiles all around,” he said. “But the important thing is that even if the people are not going away with a windfall they go away with a positive experience.”

That can include something as simple as just learning some background about a piece even if they do not necessarily want to sell it. The show takes place from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at the Ramada.