Crowds pack King Stadium at the 2018 Denim on the Diamond show in downtown Kelowna. The 1-day festival returns Aug. 31. (Denim on the Diamond Facebook)

Denim on the Diamond festival returns to the Okanagan bigger and better

The end of summer festival returns to King Stadium in Kelowna Aug. 31

The end of summer is fast approaching which means the return of Denim on the Diamond.

The one-day festival is back Aug. 31 and will take over King Stadium in downtown Kelowna for day-long concerts, games, activities and feasting.

“It’s become more of a folk-fest because everyone is welcome,” organizer Mitch Carefoot said.

“The theme of the festival is to include everyone; there’s country, blues, R&B, and rock music. It’s going to be bigger turnout than last year and we’re excited about that.”

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Carefoot and business partner, Kurt Jory hoped to create a welcoming, fun, festive and community- supported environment that would become a must-do event during an Okanagan summer.

Locally brewed wine, beer and cider with food trucks expanding to include vegetarian and vegan options will fill the park along side award-winning artists from all genres.

Even the festival’s name, Denim on the Diamond, is inspired to include the wide array of festival lovers in the Okanagan.

“We were some Canadian guys on our way to hockey when the name popped up,” Carefoot said.

“Denim is something that mom wore, Bruce Springsteen, country artists, and now the younger generation is,” Carefoot said.

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In the second year of the festival, Carefoot and Jory have partnered with the Music Heals Partnership, a local charitable foundation that funds music therapy and benefits those who are unable to attend live music events.

A portion of ticket sales and the 50/50 raffle will go towards the charity which was important for the two Kelowna business people.

“Music Heals is important to us because we wanted an organization that aligns with our goal to bring people together through music,” Jory said.

“Music has the power to connect strangers, bring back nostalgic feelings and has healing powers. Music speaks to us all differently but has a way of bringing us all together.”

Acts at this years festival include James Barker Band, Madeline Merlo, Lucky Monkey, The Harpoonist and the Axe Murderer and more.

More information can be found at denimonthediamond.com.

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