Calvary

Calvary

KITCHEN STOVE FILM SERIES: Calvary a powerfully moving mystery

A good priest is faced with troubling circumstances bought about by a mysterious member of his parish.



A good priest is faced with troubling circumstances bought about by a mysterious member of his parish.

The next Kitchen Stove Film Series movie, Calvary, is a black comedy that involves a priest receiving a death threat during a confessional from a person who said he was abused as an altar boy and is looking for revenge.

The person uttering the threat to the innocent Father James (Brendan Gleeson – Gangs of New York), gives him a week to sort out his affairs. The film follows the priest in the sleepy coastal village in County Sligo, Ireland as he ponders his life and if he had made any difference at all to his community. Along the way he deals with a cast of characters who leaves the audience wondering who was the person in the confessional box. This includes a butcher (Chris O’Dowd – Bridesmaids), a medic (Aiden Gillen – Game of Thrones) and a squire (Dylan Moran – Run, Fatboy, Run).

Father James continues to comfort his own fragile daughter (Kelly Reilly – Sherlock Holmes) and to help members of his church with their various problems, but he feels a foreboding sinister force closing in and begins to wonder if he will have the courage to face his own personal calvary.

The film offers a contemplative portrait of faith and guilt and features lively performances, beautiful scenery and touching compassion. Calvary has won several awards including best lead actor (Gleeson), best film, best screenplay, best director and best supporting actress (Orla O’Rourke) at the Irish Film and Television Awards.

Pre-purchased tickets are $13 and sold at the Penticton Art Gallery and The Book Shop. Limited single tickets may be available at the door for $15. Series tickets are $38 for members and students and $44 for non-members.

Calvary is showing at the Landmark Cinema 7 at 4 and 7 p.m. on Oct. 16.