Okanagan Symphony returns to Cleland Theatre

Finally we are able to enjoy the Okanagan Symphony Orchestra at the Cleland Theatre again

Finally we are able to enjoy the Okanagan Symphony Orchestra at the Cleland Theatre again.

It was quite an odyssey through a variety of venues last season. In last Saturday’s OSO concert all seats were taken as the lights dimmed for John Estacio’s adagio for strings Such Sweet Sorrow.

This reflective piece had contemporary harmonics that were poignant without harshness. There were laments reminiscent of Hebrew chants on solo violin, viola and cello. They alternated with the full orchestra weaving a tapestry of kaleidoscopic sounds that built up to a climax and diminished into a delicate shimmering whisper that ended in perfect silence.

Music is not merely entertainment. It also can be an expression of the full spectrum of human emotion, a vital part of religious and civic ceremonies, and a great comfort in times of darkness. All this is true for Mozart’s Requiem, the great composer’s final oeuvre in which he displays all the technical skill and emotional depth he acquired in his short life. It was wonderful to witness its performance last night.

Expectations rose as the 100 members of the Okanagan Symphony Chorus filed into their places behind the orchestra. Then the four soloists — soprano Melina Moore, mezzo-soprano Dana Luccock, tenor Isaiah Bell and baritone Alan Corbishley — appeared in dark suits and sparkling gowns.

The singing blended beautifully with the orchestra. Mozart’s instrumentation excluded the flutes and the French horn but featured bassoons and basset horns which gave it a sombre, haunting colour that resembled the human voice. The Latin words rang in the ears like magic incantations as the drama of after-life according to Christian beliefs unfolded in the music. It was a passionate dialogue with God:  fear of judgment, pleading for mercy, intimate prayer, loving benediction and final triumph and adoration were expressed in masterfully crafted verses.

At the end, students of Penticton Academy of Music came on stage offering flowers to the soloists. The audience applauded enthusiastically and headed home with uplifted spirits.

Just Posted

Recovery centre operator said neighbours bought property ‘in haste’

Penticton addiction recovery centre plan halted by neighbours

Attempted carjacking at Penticton mall

A 24-year-old man is in custody, while a 37-year-old woman was uninjured by the incident

Fundraising effort for man assaulted at Penticton nightclub

A GoFundMe account was created to assist the Penticton man that was assaulted

Osoyoos looking at two more councillors

The increase would take council from five to seven members, on par with their neighbours in Oliver

Forgoing Christmas gifts to help the Salvation Army

Penticton group gives to Salvation Army

Sagmoen case adjourned, again

Small, yet mighty, rally again on Vernon courthouse steps

Performance embodies true meaning of Christmas

Caravan Farm Theatre presents O. Henry’s The Gift of the Magi by Maristella Roca until Dec. 31

Family of Vancouver Island RCMP officer killed by drunk driver sues

Lawsuit seeks financial compensation from Kenneth Jacob Fenton

SPCA seizes 74 animals from Barriere property

Constables removed sheep, piglets, chickens and more

Victoria gets approval for supervised consumption site

It is scheduled to open in the spring/summer of 2018 and will be the first permanent facility on Vancouver Island

Bear spray used in tenant dispute

Salmon Arm RCMP responding to Tappen home invasion find occupants sprayed in repllent

Home services, rental rates top concerns: B.C. seniors’ watchdog

Premier John Horgan pledges action on rental housing in 2018

‘Game-changing’ B.C.-born technology tests brain vital signs

B.C. neuroscientist describes the tech as ‘the world’s first objective physiological yard stick for brain function’

5-year anniversary of Sandy Hook shooting

When just saying ‘I’m from Newtown’ can be a cross to bear

Most Read