(BC Wildfire Service)

(BC Wildfire Service)

Christie Mountain wildfire crews burning single trees, scanning mountainside for hot spots

Smoke continues to be visible as Christie Mountain wildfire crews burn, fall single trees

A number of single trees are falling in the western flank of the Christie Mountain wildfire after being burned intentionally by crews.

Residents are warned these trees are creating visible smoke but that they are burning within the existing fire perimeter.

BC Wildfire Service notified locals of this new activity in an update Tuesday (Sept. 1) morning. The fire remains at 2,122.5 hectares in size.

Over the next few days, crews will be scanning parts of the western side of the fire, to identify any remaining hot spots.

They continue to work on the southeast side of the fire, creating 100-foot mop up from the perimeter of the fire, inwards.

In addition, crews will be patrolling hot spots along the east side of the fire, and burning pockets of fuel. Smoke will continue to be visible as a result.

On Monday (Aug. 31) the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen Emergency Operations Centre announced there is no imminent wildfire threat to residents.

READ MORE: Christie Mountain wildfire update: No imminent threat to properties

The BC Wildfire Service recently released their findings into the Christie Mountain wildfire. Fire Origin and Cause specialists determined that the cause of the fire is suspected to be lightning.

The fire status remains as ‘being held’, meaning that the fire has received sufficient suppression and it is not likely to spread beyond predetermined boundaries under current weather conditions.

All previous evacuations have been rescinded, and more information about this can be found on the Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen’s website, here.

READ MORE: Christie Mountain wildfire suspected lightning caused: BC Wildfire

READ MORE: Residents and businesses rally around evacuees of Christie Mountain wildfire

@PentictonNews
editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

bc wildfires