Feisty kitty a survivor

Chucky the cat recovering from leg amputation following throw from second-storey wind

Branch manager Corrine Ross of the South Okanagan-Similkameen SPCA spends a moment with Chucky following her return from a checkup after her right rear leg had to be amputated. Foster and permanent homes are currently being sought. There are indications the year-old cat was thrown from a second floor window resulting in the leg and pelvic fractures. Donations are also being sought to help defray the associated medical costs related to the surgery which was performed at no charge by a West Kelowna vet.

Branch manager Corrine Ross of the South Okanagan-Similkameen SPCA spends a moment with Chucky following her return from a checkup after her right rear leg had to be amputated. Foster and permanent homes are currently being sought. There are indications the year-old cat was thrown from a second floor window resulting in the leg and pelvic fractures. Donations are also being sought to help defray the associated medical costs related to the surgery which was performed at no charge by a West Kelowna vet.

Barely out of kitten-hood, Chucky has already used up many of her nine lives.

Believed to have been thrown from a second floor window in Osoyoos, the calico-coloured tabby suffered a fractured pelvis and, although not determined initially, a badly fractured femur.

“It was strange because she never really showed any pain and she wasn’t obviously limping but when we re-X-rayed the leg we found the femur was already broken and it had actually snapped off so we had no option but to do an amputation to save her from all the pain,” said branch manager Corrine Ross, of the South Okanagan-Similkameen SPCA.

“She spent last weekend at the vet and she went for a checkup Wednesday and she’s doing really well, and just as lively as ever.

“Chucky is such a brave girl. I can only imagine what she suffered before coming into our care, but I’d say she’s ready to embark on a tri-pawed life without looking back.”

Ross added that as soon as it was determined the feisty feline could still have a very good quality of life, euthanizing her was not a consideration.

While the costs of her care and medication are still in the hundreds of dollars, and the SPCA is appealing for donations to help, the surgery to remove the leg was done at no cost.

“We are so grateful to Drs. Moshe and Noa Oz at the Rose Valley Veterinary Hospital (in West Kelowna) who, once again, have donated their time,” said Ross.

“In 2013 they were the SPCA veterinarians of the year in B.C.”

The manager did not have a lot of details about the incident in which Chucky received the injuries, just that the cat was found by someone in Osoyoos and she was initially taken to a vet there.

She was then brought to the Penticton shelter but has since not been claimed.

A foster home is being sought for the duration of her palliative care which involves regular visits to the doctor and it is hoped to find a permanent family for her after that.

“Obviously she will have to be an indoor cat and she may always having an issue with the crack in her pelvis but overall she is adjusting really well and she’s a real little jumper,” said Ross.

“It’s good that it was a back leg, animals have an easier time that way.

“Chucky is just such a personable girl and so energetic. I know she’ll make a fabulous furry family member for a forever home once she’s fully healed,” said Ross.

Anyone interested in adopting or helping with medical costs for  Chucky or any of the other animals in the care of the SPCA can donate online at spca.bc.ca/penticton, call 250-493-0136 or go to the shelter at 2200 Dartmouth Dr. in Penticton.