Interior Health expands meningococcal precautions in South Okanagan

Oliver, Osoyoos and Okanagan Falls included in the expanded precautionary immunization measure

Interior Health is expanding immunizations for meningococcal disease to individuals 15-24 years of age in the Oliver region.

This includes people from Osoyoos and Okanagan Falls who frequent the Oliver area. The Meningococcal Quadrivalent vaccine (Men-C-ACYW-135) will be offered free of charge to ensure appropriate protection. Clinics are at the Oliver Health Centre on Nov. 18 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Nov. 19 from 1 to 4 p.m. Those who are going to be vaccinated are asked to bring their immunization records and B.C. Services card/Care Card to the clinic.

Interior Health advises that individuals who are showing symptoms such as fever, headache, stiff neck, or vomiting, to seek medical attention. They ask that you do not visit local hospitals to obtain a vaccine, but attend one of the IH-offered clinics noted above.

Related: Two confirmed cases of meningococcal disease in Oliver

The precautionary measure is being taken after IH became aware of a third individual in the community who contracted meningococcal disease in early October. In a press release issued on Friday, IH indicated this is not a new case and there is no indication of sustained transmission of the bacteria in the community. This individual did not attend South Okanagan Secondary, but had social linkages to the school.

Although the risk remains low, Interior Health is reaching out to the 15-24 age group for immunization because meningococcal disease is reported more frequently among this age group.

They are also encouraging any students and staff at South Okanagan Secondary School who have not yet been vaccinated to attend an upcoming clinic. Individuals in this age group should continue to practice good personal hygiene by not sharing cigarettes or water bottles, by coughing into elbows or sleeves and by frequently washing their hands.

Transmission of meningococcal disease is by direct contact with the secretions of the nose and throat of infected individuals, or by respiratory droplets. Symptoms include sudden onset of high fever, severe headache, nausea and vomiting, stiff neck, rash, drowsiness or confusion and seizures.

For additional information about meningococcal disease, visit HealthLinkBC.

Just Posted

Down and dirty for South Okanagan burrowing owls

Volunteers needed for a series of work camps to restory burrowing owl dens

Okanagan’s smoke filled skies toxic to pets

Pet owners should take extra precautions with pets until smoke dissipates

Powwow honours children

Between the Lakes powwow devotes Sunday to children

Air support grounded as fires fill the skies with smoke

Update Aug. 19 1:25 p.m. A majority of air support is still… Continue reading

Auntie Says: Mind your own buisness

Faye Arcand is a freelance writer living in the South Okanagan

Smoke cancels Super League Penticton, organizers give pros a gift

Super League Penticton organizers decide to send all pro competitors to championship

Canadians fear for relatives trapped amid flooding in Indian state of Kerala

More than 800,000people have been displaced by floods and landslides

IndyCar driver Wickens flown to hospital after scary crash

IndyCar said Wickens was awake and alert as he was taken to a hospital

Ex-BCTF president ‘undeterred’ after early release from pipeline protest jail term

Susan Lambert and Order of Canada recipient Jean Swanson released early

Crews continue extinguish Snowy Mountain Wildfire

The 13,359 hectare wildfire is classified as held

Flights from Kelowna International Airport affected by wildfire smoke

Passengers are being asked to check their flight’s status before arriving

Work continues on Monashee Complex wildfires

Crews will be assisted by helicopters if flying conditions improve

Fast food chains look to capitalize on vegetarian, vegan trend with new items

Seven per cent of Canadians consider themselves vegetarians and 2.3 per cent identify as vegans

Most Read