Pedestrian walk outside a grocery store in Toronto on Sunday, May 17, 2020. A new report says Black Canadians and people from most other minority groups tend to disproportionately lose out on federal civil service jobs they apply for compared with other Canadians.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Pedestrian walk outside a grocery store in Toronto on Sunday, May 17, 2020. A new report says Black Canadians and people from most other minority groups tend to disproportionately lose out on federal civil service jobs they apply for compared with other Canadians.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Most minorities disproportionately dropped from civil service hiring process: audit

The audit reviewed 15,285 applications to 181 publicly advertised jobs in 30 departments and agencies

A new report says Black Canadians and people from most other minority groups tend to disproportionately lose out on federal civil service jobs they apply for compared with other Canadians.

The audit report on the representation of employment equity groups in public service recruitment appears to back a push by the Trudeau government to make federal departments and agencies more diverse.

The audit results, released Thursday, show that most employment equity groups did not remain proportionately represented throughout the recruitment process compared with the rate at which they applied for government jobs.

Women were the only group to see an increase in representation from the application stage through to the hiring stage.

The representation rate of Indigenous people, members of visible minorities and people with disabilities decreased at different stages of the application process.

As a sub-group, Black candidates were more likely to be dropped from the hiring process than other visible-minority groups.

The audit reviewed 15,285 applications to 181 publicly advertised jobs in 30 departments and agencies.

It looked at employment equity group representation over five stages from the initial job application to the successful hiring of applicants.

However, the audit did not specify whether job applicants lived in the National Capital Region or other locations in Canada, nor did it differentiate candidates based on their educational background.

The Treasury Board Secretariat has begun looking at changes to the Public Service Employment Act to remove barriers to diversifying the federal workforce.

The Public Service Commission recommends departments and agencies review their own hiring process and practices, to identify and remove barriers for hiring from equity groups.

The commission also says it will review its own recruitment practices and calls on departments to require training on unconscious bias to job recruiters.

Terry Pedwell, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism? Make a donation here.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

BC Housing has proposed that Victory Church shelter at 352 Winnipeg Street in Penticton be extended until March 31, 2022. It was originally intended to be a shelter April 1, 2021. (Jesse Day - Western News)
Concerned residents, business owners launch petition against Penticton homeless shelter

BC Housing wants to extend the ‘temporary’ Victory Church shelter for one year

Pathways Addictions Centre is in jeopardy of closing after Interior Health has pulled all its funding and will be taking over addiction services ‘in house’ as up May 31. (Facebook)
Future of Penticton addictions centre in jeopardy after Interior Health pulls funding

Pathways has been in Penticton for over 20 years and has 10 staff, serving around 1,000 people

Ponderosa Primary Care Centre in Penticton is considered a model for care clinics going forward by the South Okanagan Division of Family Practice. (Monique Tamminga)
Mayor of Oliver calls on province to address South Okanagan doctor shortage

‘None of the people in our acquaintance that we’ve come to know here in Oliver have their own doctor’

A man wearing a mask against coronavirus walks past an NHS advertisement about COVID-19 in London, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2021. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)
92 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths: Interior Health

The region is reporting 92 cases after the weekend

The Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen has implemented extended hours at four landfills, beginning March 1, 2020. (Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen photo)
Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen extends landfill hours

Summer hours at four facility take effect March 1, 2021.

Langley resident Carrie MacKay shared a video showing how stairs are a challenge after spending weeks in hospital battling COVID-19 (Special to Langley Advance Times)
VIDEO: Stairs a challenge for B.C. woman who chronicled COVID-19 battle

‘I can now walk for six (to) 10 minutes a day’

(Black Press file photo)
Agassiz boy, 11, dies from ‘extensive injuries’: Homicide team

Agassiz RCMP were called out Friday to assist with a child in medical distress

Dr. Amit Desai of St. Francis Hospital receives a COVID-19 vaccine on Dec. 17. (Photo courtesy of CHI Franciscan)
B.C. has now vaccinated more people from COVID-19 than total confirmed cases

B.C. has reached a milestone, vaccinating roughly 1.6% of its population from the coronavirus

Summerhill Pyramid Winery. (Contributed)
Fear of ‘hotel in a vineyard’ prompts Kelowna council to defer culinary school decision

City council needs assurance the educational facility proposed at Summerhill Winery will be used as stated

Deanna Hyland, Facebook.
Near-miss on Highway 97 in Kelowna

Woman warns other drivers after almost colliding with a truck on Highway 97

Nanaimo RCMP are looking for a suspect who smashed the window of an adult toy store and made off with more than $1,200 in merchandise. (File photo)
Vancouver Island sex shop out $1,200 in merchandise after suspect steals ‘colossal’ product

Suspect smashed window of Nanaimo store, cutting himself in the process

Riverside Calvary Church in Walnut Grove. (Langley Advance Times file)
B.C. is ‘stereotyping’ churches as riskier for COVID than other spaces, lawyer argues

Judge said that freedom of expression, religion are not at issue in the case

B.C. Premier Gordon Campbell gets acquainted with Tsawwassen First Nation Chief Kim Baird’s 10-month-old daughter Sophia, husband Steve and four-year-old Amy at the B.C. legislature before a ceremony to endorse the Tsawwassen Treaty, Oct. 15, 2007. (Sharon Tiffin/Black Press)
Indigenous consent comes first and last for B.C. industrial projects

Environment minister can still approve permits without consent

In this photo taken in 2014, a Fisheries officer displays a chinook salmon that has been snagged - an illegal method of catching fish that involves hooking them, often in the belly or tail or fins. They often get away but the injuries can lead to death or the inability of a female fish to spawn. (DFO photo)
Shuswap man gets more penalties after breaking fishing prohibition

Ashton Creek man gets second prohibition after catching chinook illegally in Shuswap River in 2014

Most Read