Ascent Films has won an award for its documentary A River Film. - Image: Ascent Films

Okanagan documentary wins prestigious award

A River Film puts the spotlight on water management and has now been honoured

A Central Okanagan-made documentary focusing on water issues in the region has won a prestigious award

Jiri and Lucie Bakala, the husband and wife production team at Ascent Films Inc., have won the Award of Excellence from The Impact DOCS Awards Competition for their documentary A River Film.

The award was given for their newest exciting documentary, A River Film. The film features exceptional cinematography and storytelling. A River Film was produced for the International Joint Commission in close collaboration with Washington State Department of Ecology and the Okanagan Basin Water Board.

A River Film presents the story of successful transboundary management of water resources in the Okanagan/Okanogan Basin and Osoyoos Lake by presenting the perspectives of water managers, farmers, first nations and tribes, scientists, and others on both sides of the border.

Although the film focuses on the Okanagan/Okanogan Basin in particular, the themes presented throughout the film are universal and apply to other transboundary watersheds in the United States and Canada.

Impact DOCS recognizes film, television, videography and new media professionals who demonstrate exceptional achievement in craft and creativity, and those who produce standout entertainment or contribute to profound social change.

“The judges and I were simply blown away by the variety and immensely important documentaries we screened,” said Rick Prickett, who chairs Impact DOCS. “Impact DOCS is not an easy award to win. Entries are received from around the world from powerhouse companies to remarkable new talent. Impact DOCS helps set the standard for craft and creativity as well as power catalysts for global change.”

Documentaries were received from 30 countries, including veteran award winning filmmakers and fresh new talent. Entries were judged by highly qualified and award winning professionals in the film and television industry.

In winning an Impact DOCS award, Ascent Films Inc. joins the ranks of other high-profile winners of this internationally respected award including the Oscar winning director Louie Psihoyos for his 2016 Best of Show – Racing Extinction, Oscar winner Yael Melamede for (Dis)Honesty – The Truth About Lies, and Emmy Award winner Gerald Rafshoon for Endless Corridors narrated by Oscar winner Jeremy Irons.

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