Penticton artist faces setback on journey

Home for less than a day, Penticton’s Robin Edgar Haworth was already itching to get back on the road again.

Robin Edgar Haworth and Koda are hoping to get back on the road as soon as possible after returning to Penticton recently due to health concerns. The pair had to end their Right the Wrong trek to Ottawa shortly after crossing the Ontario and Manitoba border.

Robin Edgar Haworth and Koda are hoping to get back on the road as soon as possible after returning to Penticton recently due to health concerns. The pair had to end their Right the Wrong trek to Ottawa shortly after crossing the Ontario and Manitoba border.

Home for less than a day, Penticton’s Robin Edgar Haworth was already itching to get back on the road again.

The artist arrived at the local airport July 4 with canine companion Koda after cutting short his Right the Wrong trek to Ottawa earlier in the week due to health concerns.

“I feel this journey is not complete and I don’t want to go out and have the last thing people say to me being, ‘oh I’m sorry, I’m sorry you couldn’t complete your trip,” said Haworth during breakfast at the small channel-side restaurant he frequents. “I guess I’ll have a much better idea of what’s happening after I see the doctor later today (July 7).”

Haworth first began experiencing problems while walking along the highway the morning of July 1 about 30 kilometres east of Kenora, Ont.

“We were just going up a hill, no steeper or longer than any we’d gone up before but it was warm and very humid and my heart started palpitating,” he recalled “It went from normal to double or more and may have even stopped and I had an incredible pain in my chest.”

Sitting down on the side of the road he began to collect his thoughts and decided to return the 30 kilometres to Kenora.

Fortunately a passerby stopped and gave the pair a ride. Feeling better, he decided not to seek medical help but got another ride to the airport in Winnipeg, Man. and a flight home.

Since leaving Penticton in the spring, the walker had completed about 2,300 kilometres and had another 1,400 to get his final destination, the nation’s capital.

His plan is to talk to as many people, in particular politicians, about missing and murdered aboriginal women and other social issues he feels need addressing.

The support of his cause by the many “amazing and incredible” people he’s met along the journey so far is one of the main reasons Haworth wants to continue. If his condition allows, Haworth plans to catch a flight back to Winnipeg and pick up where he left off in Ontario as soon as possible.

“We’ll just see what the doctor says, but my head wants to go,” he said. “I’m think I’m strong spiritually and mentally and I think physically except for this one incident and now I don’t feel bad. Now that I’m back here things don’t look as bleak.

“Koda is doing just fine I think he’s happy to be back in a little bit more familiar surroundings here but I believe he also wants to continue the journey until the end just like I do.”