Penticton becoming hub for modular construction industry

Demand for factory-built homes spurs business growth

The modular housing industry is on the rise in Penticton, with new businesses coming to town to set up plants.

“We’ve had a well-established history of this industry in Penticton and the new companies are certainly taking advantage of the economic climate right now,” said Anthony Haddad, director of development services for Penticton.

Haddad notes there are already well-established modular housing firms in town already, like the long-established Moduline and Metric Modular, which took over the old Britco location.

The latest addition to Penticton is Jandel Homes, an Alberta-based modular home company that expanded here in June.

“My projections are that within five years of being in the Okanagan Valley, we should be at the same volumes as Alberta. I see very large potential here,” said Mark Huchulak, president and CEO of Jandel Homes.

Jandel joins other companies, like the Radec group that have also chosen to take advantage of what Penticton has to offer.

Penticton also offers easy access to transportation routes serving the Okanagan and beyond.

“I think that is one of the big benefits of locating in Penticton for these types of businesses and others, the superior access to a number of different transportation networks,” said Haddad.

Increased demand is fuelling big business, which is resulting in strong employment growth and spurring the local economy.

Metric Modular is also facing substantial growth and is hiring at its Penticton plant.

Related: Modular construction plant rebounds to 50 employees

“Penticton has been the natural hub for the modular home industry for years, supporting the Okanagan Valley,” said Stephen Branch, president of Metric Modular. “We now have teamed up with our sister company Triple M Housing to provide both commercial products and single-family homes from this hub.”

Innovative designs and wider applications are also fuelling the growth of modular housing, according to Haddad.

“We’re seeing the modular housing industry innovating in the types of housing. It’s not just single-family houses that can be built with this type of construction,” he said. “We’re seeing a variety of different options through carriage houses, multi-family developments, even on the commercial side; hotels for example.”

The Coast Oliver Hotel, Haddad added, was built with modular construction and recently opened.

“The array of housing types and development types that the modular home sector can provide for, provides an efficient construction process, resulting in lower costs and providing a more affordable housing type within the Okanagan,” said Haddad.

Designs have continually improved to meet demand, according to Walter Fontinha, sales manager of Moduline.

“The modular business is growing because the look of the homes have changed in the last 15 years. They look a lot more residential. Modular homes are being more accepted within city limits among site-built homes,” said Fontinha.

Related: Moduline retirees reflect on time with company

An example of that, said Haddad, is the Bridgewater development in Penticton, which is close to being built out.

“There has been a lot of interest in the new developments in using modular construction,” said Haddad. “With the growing construction industry in the whole Okanagan, the ability for this type of construction method to provide for a wide range of housing is a huge opportunity that we are seeing some new companies invest in Penticton for.”


Steve Kidd
Senior reporter, Penticton Western News
Email me or message me on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Just Posted

Sandelin scores twice as Penticton Vees defeat West Kelowna Warriors

Penticton Vees bounced back to defeat the West Kelowna Warriors in second of home-and-home series

Okanagan mentor awarded national Coach of the Year

Penticton’s Rob Kober was named the Jack Donohue Coach of the Year

International students hit hard by B.C. tuition fee hikes

Campaign seeks regulatory controls be imposed on post-secondary institutions

Summerland wineries turn on the lights

Bottleneck Drive offers 8th annual Light up the Vines

Share a Smile Telethon moves to Cherry Lane Shopping Centre

The 39th annual event benefits the OSNS Child & Youth Development Centre

Your weekday weather update

Flurries and more rain anticipated for the Okanagan - Shuswap

EU divorce deal in peril after two UK Cabinet ministers quit

Negotiators from Britain and the European Union have struck a proposed divorce deal that will be presented to politicians on both sides for approval, officials in London and Brussels said Tuesday.

Feds respond to sexual assault investigation at B.C. naval base

Report of Oct. 5 sexual assault on Vancouver Island base taken over by Canadian Forces National Investigation Service

Northern California fire death toll at 56; 130 missing

Many of the missing are elderly and from Magalia, a forested town of about 11,000 to the north of Paradise.

Canfor to buy 70 per cent stake in Swedish Vida Group for $580 million

The privately held company has nine sawmills in southern Sweden with an annual production capacity of 1.1 billion board feet.

Saudi prosecutor seeks death penalty in Khashoggi’s killing

Saudi Arabia’s top prosecutor is recommending the death penalty for five suspects charged with ordering and carrying out the killing of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi.

Mixing business and family: Trudeau turns to Singapore ancestors to widen trade

Trudeau’s ancestor, Esther Bernard, born Farquhar (1796-1838) was the daughter of Major-General William Farquhar (1774-1839), the first British Resident and Commandant of Singapore.

Baloney Meter: Will tougher penalties for gang members make Canada safer?

Since 2013, gang-related homicides in Canada’s largest cities have almost doubled

Early data suggests no spike in pot-impaired driving after legalization: police

Some departments said it’s too early to provide data, others said initial numbers suggest stoned driving isn’t on the rise

Most Read