The property located at 175 Brunswick St. in Penticton, and its contents, has been officially declared a nuisance by city council. The owner now has until Oct. 31 to complete the required remedial actions. (Photo from City of Penticton)

The property located at 175 Brunswick St. in Penticton, and its contents, has been officially declared a nuisance by city council. The owner now has until Oct. 31 to complete the required remedial actions. (Photo from City of Penticton)

Penticton council declares Brunswick Street property a nuisance

The owner now has until Oct. 31 to complete remedial action requirements

The City of Penticton is taking aim at a newly-declared nuisance property on Brunswick Street.

The property in question, 175 Brunswick St., is a single detached dwelling and contains a detached shed and an RV camper and a vehicle on the property. According to the 2019 BC Assessment, the land is valued at $341,000 and the buildings at $95,200.

At the regular meeting on Aug. 6, the council voted unanimously to declare the property and its contents a nuisance “as they are dilapidated, unclean and offensive to the community” and that the owner take the remedial actions required. These include implementing a rodent remediation program, obtaining the proper permit and demolishing the house and shed, removing the overgrown vegetation and more.

“The strategic priority for this is definitely community safety. We want to ensure that we support a safe, secure and healthy community and we want to make sure that it’s not taken over and becomes an issue and an eyesore and a nuisance in the community,” said Tina Siebert, bylaw supervisor with the city. “And (the property) is quite dilapidated so that’s the objective.”

READ MORE: Overgrown property causing concern for neighbours

Siebert said in 2017 the city’s file was transferred to the property use and licence inspector to resolve, but the owner would not complete the vacant building registration permit. She added that in 2018, the owner did not comply with the fire chief’s order to disconnect electrical power as the property was deemed an imminent danger to life and property, resulting in city staff completing this request.

“Staff continued to receive complaints from members of the community near the property area to attend the property and board it up. It sounds like there were some delays due to a death in the family and a transfer of ownership in the will and an executive process,” said Siebert, explaining why it took a lengthy amount of for this matter to come before council.

Under the Community Charter, the city is allowed to undertake remedial action if they are not carried out within the time set by a council resolution. The property owner has until 4:30 p.m. on Oct. 31, 2019, to complete the requirements.

“(If necessary) the city will collect the amount incurred from the owner in the same manner and remedies as property taxes, therefore the taxes are deemed in arrears if unpaid. Also, the unpaid taxes would constitute a charge on the land and have priority over any other claim, lien or privilege,” said Siebert. “Staff believe that there is sufficient equity in the property to recover incurred expenses if it is necessary for the city to complete the remedial work, which is where we’re at.”

Siebert said she has a “few more properties on her radar” in terms of ones that may soon constitute a nuisance to the community.

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.

Jordyn Thomson | Reporter
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