Penticton city council chambers were packed for a special meeting where council voted 5-2 in favour to accept the settlement and enhanced marina agreements with Trio Marine Group.

Penticton city council chambers were packed for a special meeting where council voted 5-2 in favour to accept the settlement and enhanced marina agreements with Trio Marine Group.

Penticton council votes 5-2 to accept Trio agreements

Penticton City Council voted 5-2 to accept the settlement and enhanced marina agreements with Trio Marine Group.

In front of a packed council chambers, Penticton City Council voted 5-2 to accept the settlement and enhanced marina agreements with Trio Marine Group.

Though it was unlikely anyone would have a chance to speak other than staff and councillors, Penticton city council chambers were packed full as soon as the doors were opened for a special meeting Thursday night.

At issue were the latest agreements the city proposed to sign with Trio Marine Group, eliminating the controversial waterslide agreement, but still leaving many people unsure about how the settlement and enhanced marina agreements would affect green space in Skaha Lake Park.

The public had their chance for input last week, at a meeting that drew 700 people to temporary council chambers at the Trade and Convention Centre. By the end of the meeting, it was clear the crowd was predominantly opposed, even to the new agreements.

Read more: Large turnout for public meeting on Skaha Lake agreements

Interim CAO Mitch Moroziuk started the meeting with three new changes have been made, starting with a proposed location for the boathouse concession, which has been reoriented. The exclusion area, giving Trio right of refusal over other amenities in a large are of the park, was reduced substantially to an area from the marina to the existing boathouse.

The possibility of a marine play structure was also removed, being replaced with a clause saying the city would not endorse an aquatic play structure until 2028.

“I feel comfortable this revised settlement agreement meets most of the concerns,” said Coun. Max Picton. “Personally, I would have liked to see a waterslide.”

Picton added that while he and others wanted to see the waterslide, they didn’t want it so badly they would divide the city over it.

Coun. Campbell Watt spoke against the agreement.

“I think we made a mistake getting to this point,” said Watt. “The best direction isn’t moving forward, it is starting again.”

Coun. Andre Martin voiced his support of the proposal, drawing groans from the audience, which intensified when Coun. Helena Konanz claimed that people were afraid to speak out in favor of the Trio proposals, and indeed were afraid to come to meetings such as this one.

“Everything has been addressed,” said Konanz, adding that she should have realized building in a park on green space would not be acceptable.

“I regret so much of it and we have everything people have been asking for in one proposal,” said Konanz.

Mayor Andrew Jakubeit said making a decision was a struggle.

“No one wants to see division in a community,” said Jakubeit. “I understand that a year and a half of battling city hall … it is difficult to flick a switch and move on.”

Jakubeit spoke to the city’s infrastructure deficit.

“There is more need than we have money to spend on,” said Jakubeit. “That is why partnerships are an attractive option.

Jakubeit said that concerns over Trio’s capability would be answered next May, either when the project to develop the marina got underway, or fell by the wayside, as the dates for conditions precedent started to arrive.

Many other good things happening in our city are being overshadowed by this,” said Jakubeit.

Coun. Tarik Sayeed, appearing on a monitor from a remote location, also spoke against it, especially the length of the lease, which is 29 years, with two five year extensions.

“I don’t see this as a partnership, I see it as domination,” said Coun. Tarik Sayeed. “I can’t accept this proposal as presented.”

Sayeed, along with Watt, were the only two councillors to vote against accepting the proposals.

 

 

Just Posted

RCMP thanked the public for assistance in finding Benjamin Archie, last seen in Princeton. (RCMP)
Missing Chilliwack man found safe and sound

The 80-year-old had walked away from his home in Chilliwack

57-year-old Kathleen Richardson was discovered deceased in her home Wednesday, June 9, 2021. Her death is considered a homicide and connected to the slain brothers found on a Naramata forest road. (Submitted)
Naramata community in shock as condolences pour in for homicide victim Kathy Richardson

Richardson was well liked in the community, a volunteer firefighter with a home-based salon

Princeton GSAR responds 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. In 2020 the crew was called out 34 times, and members spent 721 hours on calls, and 683 hours training. Photo Princeton GSAR Facebook
Teen missing in Manning Park found after 24 hours

Young man spends night on mountain and survives with just a few scrapes

The RCMP are asking for assistance regarding the death of Kathleen Richardson of Naramata, pictured here. Her death is believed to be related to two homicides in Naramata in May. (RCMP)
Suspected Naramata homicide victim identified by police

57-year-old Kathleen Richardson was discovered deceased in her home Wednesday

(File photo)
Reports of aggressive deer in Penticton prompt warning from city

Expect female deer to be more aggressive over the next two months

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

The Queen Victoria statue at the B.C. legislature was splattered with what looks like red paint on Friday. (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)
UPDATE: Queen Victoria statue at B.C. legislature vandalized Friday

Statue base splattered with what looks to be red paint, old-growth logging protest held in afternoon

Police cars are seen parked outside Vancouver Police Department headquarters on Saturday, January 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Vancouver police officer charged with assault during an arrest in 2019

The service has released no other details about the allegations

Denmark’s Christian Eriksen receives medical attention after collapsing during the Euro 2020 soccer championship group B match between Denmark and Finland at Parken stadium in Copenhagen, Saturday, June 12, 2021. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, Pool)
Denmark soccer player Christian Eriksen collapses during game against Finland

Eriksen was given chest compressions after collapsing on the field during a European Championship

Members of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ Marine Mammal Response Program rescued an adult humpback what that was entangled in commercial fishing gear in the waters off of Entrance Island on Thursday, June 10. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Response Program)
Rescuers free humpback ‘anchored’ down by prawn traps off Vancouver Island

Department of Fisheries and Oceans responders spend hours untangling whale

As stories of the horrors of residential schools circulate after the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc First Nation announced it had located what are believed to be the remains of 215 children, Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs said he feels a connection with the former students. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
2 sides of the same coin: Ex-foster kids identify with residential school survivors

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip says the child welfare system takes Indigenous children from their families

Nathan Watts, a member of the Tseshaht First Nation near Port Alberni, shares his story of substance use, a perspective he said isn’t seen enough. (Photo courtesy of Nathan Watts)
Public shaming, hate perpetuates further substance use: UVic researcher

Longtime addict Nathan Watts offers a user’s perspective on substance use

57-year-old Kathleen Richardson was discovered deceased in her home Wednesday, June 9, 2021. Her death is considered a homicide and connected to the slain brothers found on a Naramata forest road. (Submitted)
Condolences pour in for Kathy Richardson, Naramata’s 3rd homicide victim in recent weeks

Richardson was well liked in the community, a volunteer firefighter with a home-based salon

Most Read