A plaque is seen outside of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School on Tk’emlups te Secwépemc First Nation in Kamloops, B.C. on Thursday, May 27, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Snucins

A plaque is seen outside of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School on Tk’emlups te Secwépemc First Nation in Kamloops, B.C. on Thursday, May 27, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Snucins

Penticton mayor expresses grief over children buried at Kamloops residential school

215 children were discovered buried at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

Penticton City Council will observe a moment of silence during Tuesday’s meeting to express sorrow over the discovery of the remains of 215 children buried at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School.

Mayor John Vassilaki made a statement on Friday, extending sympathies from both the council and residents of Penticton to Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc (TteS) and surrounding communities as well as the Penticton Indian Band, over the discovery.

“This discovery is a tragic reminder of the devastating and ongoing impact and trauma caused by residential schools and the importance of recognizing the past and working towards reconciliation,” said Vassilaki.

He also encouraged members of the community to reach out to the Penticton Indian Band neighbours and show support during this incredibly difficult time.

READ MORE: Remains of 215 children found at former B.C. residential school an ‘unthinkable loss’

READ MORE: Michelle Good’s book answers why Indigenous people can’t ‘get over’ residential school trauma

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