A Penticton-based research team has just completed a study into fibromyalgia to help patients better manage the pain associated with the chronic  condition.

A Penticton-based research team has just completed a study into fibromyalgia to help patients better manage the pain associated with the chronic condition.

Penticton research team leads pain treatment options

A Penticton-based research team has just completed a study into fibromyalgia and is holding a symposium to share information.

Life with pain is never easy.

A Penticton-based research team has just completed a study into fibromyalgia to help patients better manage the pain associated with the chronic condition.

“We held a three month trial with fibromyalgia patients to see what we can do to impact their pain,” said Dr. Michell Teo, a Penticton rheumatologist who headed the study. “What we found is we are lacking collaboration from all health care providers that can make a difference in these people’s lives and that the model we are studying can be successful.”

The feasibility study involved 11 people who had weekly medical visits, worked with a dietician, offered an exercise regime from physiotherapists, were given guidance in workshops and learned how to deal with sleeping disorders from a psychiatrist.

Teo said they were pleased with the results from the first study and will share the information learned for those living with pain, their loved ones and their health care providers at a Chronic Pain Symposium on June 8 at 6:30 p.m. at the Shatford Centre.

Teo said chronic pain can decrease one’s ability to function and impacts their quality of life. Different treatments are currently available, but most do not address all of the patient’s needs at the same time.

The medical team involved in the study will provide information on treatment options and practical solutions.

Topics include a better understanding of chronic pain, treatment options, self-management resources, and the role of different health care professionals in the treatment of chronic pain.

Other team members on the symposium’s panel include Nelly Oelke, associate professor at the UBCO School of Nursing; Dr. David Paisley; Dr. Siva Raghavan, anesthesiologist and pain physician; and physiotherapist Neil Pearson.

The two-hour seminar includes a coffee break.  Admission is free.  Parking is free and is also available next door at Penticton Secondary School.

Funding for the research was provided through the South Okanagan Similkameen Medical Foundation. Teo said they are hoping to present the information from the study at a national conference this year and eventually looking to publish the results in a medical journal. She added they are hoping for more funding to continue the second phase of the study to involve more people.