Penticton students go bananas for RAK Day

It’s BYOB on RAK Day next week at Princess Margaret Secondary School.

Students Isabella Biggs (left) and Megan Francisco of Princess Margaret Secondary School apply the toppings to the giant banana split at the school Thursday as students prepare for their own version of the Random Acts of Kindness Day on Nov. 6.

Students Isabella Biggs (left) and Megan Francisco of Princess Margaret Secondary School apply the toppings to the giant banana split at the school Thursday as students prepare for their own version of the Random Acts of Kindness Day on Nov. 6.

It’s BYOB on RAK Day next week at Princess Margaret Secondary School.

On Random Acts of Kindness Day (Friday, Nov. 6) students have been told to “bring your own banana” and they will receive a free banana split.

This not-so-random event has been taking place at the school for a while now however organizers decided that particular day was the perfect time to fill the banana boat.

The splits are just one of the activities planned for RAK Day in and around Maggie, which, like many other schools in the district are planning to do a lot of nice things.

“I think it’s just great to be kind, it’s unexpected and it really just makes people’s day,” said Maggie student and leadership team member Megan Francisco. “The little things people do makes others feel appreciated and feel in a positive mood.”

One nice thing that will be done is notes with messages posted on a large board for each student.

As well, Post-It notes will be taken next door to Skaha Lake Middle School to be put on the lockers to brighten students’ days there.

“You hear about it months afterwards and how people were just smiling the whole day because they get this positive little note,” added Francisco.

Fellow student and team member Isabella Biggs agreed about the importance of the event: “I think if everyone did it, it would make the world a much better place.”

People who live in the area of the school will also be targeted by students to have some good deeds come their way according to vice principal Sandra Richardson who works with the leadership team.

“I think it helps our kids become more visible in the community, it helps raise the profile for our students and that’s a good thing,” said Richardson. “Also, I think it helps that students feel that other people in the school notice them and that they are part of something special.

“I guess it’s kind of an oxymoron — random acts of kindness — there’s nothing random about it, but if kids get it in their mindset that it’s okay to do these things on other days I think that’s good as well.”

The feeling is much the same over at Penticton Secondary School where plenty of RAK’s will be doled out by students like Jessica Craine, a member of that school’s leadership team.

“I think the small things we can do are the most important,” said Craine. “The things we do unconsciously for others, like smiling at them when you walk past and I just think this day sort of amplifies it a lot and makes you realize that it really does make a difference and makes them want to do something nice for someone else too.”

According to Pen High vice principal Andrea Devito, the school has a RAK committee which works on projects throughout the year.

“So it isn’t just a one day of (random acts of kindness), and I do think there is a kind of domino effect that sort of comes in through the microcosm community of a school that can help build a culture of kindness,” said Devito. “Kids have an incredible affinity for kindness, maybe even more so than adults at times

“It’s gratifying to be kind to other people, it makes you feel good, it makes your heart feel good.”