Physiotherapy could help combat B.C.’s opioid crisis: report

A provincial association says physio is a non-pharmaceutical adjunct to prescribed opioids

The Physiotherapy Association of BC says it could be an integral piece of the puzzle in combatting the province’s opioid crisis.

In a report released Tuesday, the association says that for patients who suffer from chronic or acute pain, physiotherapy could be a suitable treatment alternative for management instead of turning to opioid prescriptions.

“At a time when British Columbians are searching for answers to the province’s drug opioid crisis, physio can help,” the report reads.

According to the association, one in five adult Canadians suffer from chronic pain – a ‘multifaceted disorder associated with considerable disability’, and can be a burden to the patient and the health care system.

The report says a 2014 study shows that about 5 per cent of adults who have been prescribed an opioid pain reliever has misused or abused their medication.

In recent months, advocates and policy makers have noted the apparent role prescriptions of opioids play into addiction and the 931 overdose deaths that occurred in 2016 – a steady trend continuing this year.

In an email to Black Press, provincial health officer Dr. Perry Kendall said, “physio certainly has riles to play in pain management and lowering the need for opioids.”

RELATED: B.C. health officer leads push for European-style heroin treatment programs

Kendall has vocalized the need for alternative treatments for opioid addiction in the past, including prescription heroin.

The association also argues physiotherapy is a more cost-effective strategy for the the province.

Heading into the May 9 election, the association says policy makers should consider the benefit physiotherapists could have in combatting the increase in prescription drug abuse, rising overdoses and the increase costs of prescription drugs.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Morning Start: Dogs can smell cancer

Your morning start for Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Missing Penticton woman located by RCMP

Iesha Blomquist was reported missing on June 30

Video: Okanagan College congratulates 2020 grads

Over 2000 recent grads had their convocation postponed due to the pandemic

Show off your homegrown South Okanagan veggies in this photo contest

Contest encourages residents to flaunt their homegrown produce

In photos: Penticton Speedway celebrates opening weekend

Despite having to turn away roughly 700 cars, organizers celebrating a successful weekend of racing

B.C. records 31 new cases, six deaths over three days due to COVID-19

There are 166 active cases in B.C., 16 people in hospital

YLW implements further safety measures amid COVID-19

The new safety measures came into effect on July 7

Two dead after weekend crash on Highway 1 near Revelstoke

The driver and passenger of one vehicle died at the scene

96-year-old woman scales B.C. butte with help of family, friends

‘I did as I was told and I enjoyed every minute of it’

Parallel crises: How COVID-19 exacerbated B.C.’s drug overdose emergency

Part 1: Officials say isolation, toxic drug supply, CERB, contributing to crisis

Canadians with disabilities disproportionately hit by COVID-19 pandemic

More than four out of 10 British Columbians aged 70 and up have various disabilities

Camping offers a great pandemic escape, for less money than you might think

But for many first-timers, knowing what to bring can be a challenge

Turbulence in Canadian opinion on airlines COVID-19 response: poll

Thousands of people have beseeched Transport Minister Marc Garneau to compel airlines to issue refunds,

Most Read