From left Coun. Richard Barkwill of Summerland, Coun. Tim Lezard and Coun. Clint Gabriel of the Penticton Indian Band, MLA Dan Ashton, MP Dan Albas, Dave Hellard of True Consulting and Summerland mayor Toni Boot show a portion of the lakeside pathway in Summerland. The pathway was damaged by flooding in 2017 and 2018. It has now been repaired. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

From left Coun. Richard Barkwill of Summerland, Coun. Tim Lezard and Coun. Clint Gabriel of the Penticton Indian Band, MLA Dan Ashton, MP Dan Albas, Dave Hellard of True Consulting and Summerland mayor Toni Boot show a portion of the lakeside pathway in Summerland. The pathway was damaged by flooding in 2017 and 2018. It has now been repaired. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

Summerland completes work on lakeshore pathway

Pathway had been damaged by floods in 2017 and 2018

The municipality of Summerland has completed most of the flood recovery works at Peach Orchard Beach and Rotary Beach.

The project reached substantial completion on June 15. The remaining work includes a small amount of grass seeding, plantings, new light standards, and minor concrete work.

During the spring flooding in 2017, high water levels eroded the pathway along Okanagan Lake. The following year, high water levels also affected the lakeshore area.

Funding came from the Disaster Financial Assistance program to repair areas damaged by the flooding. In addition, the municipality contributed to the project for additional upgrades and improvements to the path.

READ ALSO: Damaged lakefront path in Summerland will be repaired

READ ALSO: Crews repairing damaged Summerland pathway

The total project budget for the flood recovery works is $540,000, with the District contributing $271,323 and the remainder provided through the Disaster Financial Assistance Program.

“The District of Summerland is grateful for the financial assistance received from the province to help with the repairs at our treasured waterfront,” said Summerland mayor Toni Boot. “We are pleased that the repairs have been completed before summer, in time for the full use and enjoyment of the pathway by Summerland residents and visitors to our town. We thank our residents for their patience as our crews and contractors worked to finalize the repairs.”

The repairs to the pathway fall within the council priorities of infrastructure investment and active lifestyles.

Tim Lezard, a councillor with the Penticton Indian Band, said the pathway will allow people to use and enjoy the waterfront area.

“Our people have been enjoying this place for many generations,” he said. “The land is meant to be enjoyed by all people.”

The project started in 2020 after obtaining a required license of occupation from the province and the permitting to work in and around the watercourse. Due to high water levels in 2020, the work was suspended and carried forward to 2021 in order to complete the path when lake levels dropped enough for construction.

The municipality also expanded the scope of work to replace areas of the pathway that had heaved from the roots of nearby trees. Root barrier was installed adjacent to the new pathway next to the trees to maximize the life span of the asphalt path. Concrete walls and curbing, large rip rap rock armouring and plantings were also installed to help prevent erosion during future high lake level and storm events.

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