While the snow has melted in the Okanagan Valley, Summerland’s two measurement sites still have significant snow levels. (File photo)

While the snow has melted in the Okanagan Valley, Summerland’s two measurement sites still have significant snow levels. (File photo)

Summerland’s April 1 snow pack levels near normal

Measurements were taken at Summerland Reservoir and Isintok Lake

The latest snow measurements taken by the municipality of Summerland show the snowpacks at and above normal levels.

Measurements were taken at Summerland Reservoir and Isintok Lake on April 1. The two sites are to the west of Summerland.

READ ALSO: March 1 snow measurement at Summerland Reservoir above normal

READ ALSO: Summerland Reservoir snow level above normal

At Summerland Reservoir, the snowpack had a depth of 840 millimetres or the equivalent of 233 millimetres of water. This is 103 per cent of the historical water equivalent of 227 millimetres, based on 58 years of measurements.

At Isintok Lake, the snow depth was 640 millimetres, or the equivalent of 171 millimetres of water. This is 100 per cent of the historical average for this site, based on 57 years of measurements.

Snowpack measurements are taken on the first day of the month from Jan. 1 to May 1. Additional measurements are taken May 15, June 1 and June 15, until the snowpack has melted. A year ago, on April 1, 2020, both Summerland sites had snowpack levels considerably higher than normal levels.

In addition, the provincial government collects and compiles data on the snowpack and water equivalent at sites around the province. According to the most recent provincial data from the province, six sites measured in the Okanagan Valley had an average snow water equivalent of 105 per cent of normal levels.

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