OWL rehabilitation society volunteer Gary Turner releases an injured bald eagle in Malakwa on Friday, June 5. (Jim Elliot/Eagle Valley News)

VIDEO: Rehabilitated eagle released after nearly three-month recovery

The bird took its first free flight in over two months on June 5.

As the blanket was pulled off the top of the dog carrier, the bald eagle inside began pecking at the door. The clicks and gurgles coming from its bright yellow beak oozed agitation and excitement. The bird’s long and painful journey was about to end with its first free flight in more than two months.

On March 15, the eagle was found on the side of the Trans-Canada Highway in Malakwa by a woman returning to the Lower Mainland from Revelstoke. After a few phone calls looking for someone who could care for the injured bird she was able to turn it over to Gary Turner, a Vernon resident who volunteers rescuing birds for the OWL Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society.

A day after being found, the eagle was on a commercial flight to Vancouver and then off to OWL’s facility in Delta.

Turner said staff told him the eagle was a mature and exceptionally large female of about eight years old. Her leg was broken, likely due to a collision with a car. The bird’s injuries were healed and it was clear she had made a full recovery.

On June 5, volunteers returned the caged bird of prey to Turner so he could release her near the area where it had been hit. On the shoulder of a rural road approximately half a kilometre off the highway, Turner opened the gate of the cage and the eagle sprang free.

She came to a stop with its talons in the dirt, looked at the small group of onlookers for a split second and then lunged off into the sky. As it wheeled south over a farmer’s field the eagle was briefly harassed by a pair of crows but a few powerful wingbeats outpaced the smaller birds and took her to the top of a tall tree.

Read More: $30,000 over 30 weeks for local causes

Read More: Salmon Arm RCMP arrest person of interest in suspected arson that destroyed garage

Turner said he hoped a reunion would follow the release as mature eagles usually have an established mate and the rehabilitated bird’s could still be nearby.

Among those watching in wonder as the eagle left the cage were Colleen Turgood and her grandchildren, Aspyn and Cohen Dupuis.

“It was so cool,” Aspyn said as the trio scanned the horizon for another glimpse of the bird.

Turner’s expression as the eagle flew off showed more focus and concern than awe. He has been a volunteer with OWL for more than 20 years and recounted some bird rescues that did not have such happy endings.

Being one of the society’s few volunteers in the Southern Interior, his workload can be immense.

He sometimes receives multiple calls a day to go help injured birds. He said more volunteers assisting with rescues and transport would be greatly appreciated. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, airlifts like the one the eagle benefited from are not feasible and so the OWL volunteers are shuttling birds too and from the rehabilitation centre by car.

Read More: Boating Safety Week a chance to take stock of hazards on Shuswap Lake

Read More: Trudeau offers $14B to provinces for anti-COVID-19 efforts through rest of year

The work is very important to Turner. He said over 90 per cent of the injured birds he has aided were negatively affected by humans in some way, so humans should take responsibility for their recovery.

He said birds of prey like the one turned loose in Malakwa are not only majestic but also serve an important ecological niche controlling the population of rodents and other small animals.

Further information about volunteering with or donating to OWL can be found on their website owlrehab.org or by emailing info@owlrehab.ca.



jim.elliot@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Penticton man who rescued family from fire says it’s him who needed rescuing

Months after saving Linda Pakfec and her family from a burning building, Gord Portman says he’s clean

‘We have your grandson’ – Princeton seniors scammed out of thousands of dollars

Two elderly Princeton men are saying they were robbed of thousands of… Continue reading

Four people rescued after floating past Penticton’s Skaha Bridge

Elevated water levels prompts safety message from local fire department

Young Stars Classic postponed due to COVID-19

The event was set to return in September after missing 2019

All community COVID-19 outbreaks declared over in B.C.

Abbotsford manufacturer cleared by Dr. Bonnie Henry

B.C. First Nations vow to keep fighting after Trans Mountain pipeline appeal denied

Squamish Nation, Tsleil-Waututh Nation and Coldwater Indian Band made the application

Noose graffiti not tolerated by Vernon resident

Woman, son paint over hateful image painted on neighbourhood fence

‘Queue jumpers’ not welcome in B.C. as COVID-19 U.S. cases rise: Horgan

Premier Horgan said he’s heard concerns that Americans have stopped at Vancouver hotels instead of heading to their destination

HERGOTT: The right to resist unlawful arrest

Paul Hergott is a personal injury lawyer based in West Kelowna

Finale of seven-week food drive arrives at FreshCo Kelowna

The new grocery store has partnered with the organization for a food drive

VIDEO: Active graduate receives Summerland Secondary School’s top honour

Devyn Slade was presented with the Verrier Award and Matsu Memorial Scholarship

US officer resigns after photos, connected to death of black man in 2019, surface

Elijah McClain died, last summer, after police placed him in a chokehold

Most Read