Waterpark wading into Penticton

An inflatable waterpark blew up on Okanagan Lake in Kelowna last summer, and the contagious business idea has been adopted in Penticton.

Waterpark wading into Penticton

An inflatable waterpark blew up on Okanagan Lake in Kelowna last summer, and the contagious business idea has been adopted in Penticton.

“We had a really good response with the park in Kelowna and because of that we wanted to set up in Penticton,” said Rylie Gallagher, co-owner of the park. “It is very cool and something that will challenge all ages.”

The Wibit park will have obstacles suitable for ages five and up

Gallagher, a graduate of Penticton Secondary School, said while growing up his family was in the watersport industry in Summerland and Penticton which grew his interest in becoming an entrepreneur. After researching watersports equipment, Gallagher decided to go with German manufacturer Wibit. The floating sports course in Penticton, which will be located on Okanagan Lake across from Salty’s Beach House, will include monkey bars, trampolines, slides and other obstacles. Gallagher believes the parks in Kelowna and Penticton are the only open water public parks of their kind in Western Canada.

“I saw a great opportunity for this in the Okanagan and jumped on it. I actually never had been on a Wibit park before we set up the Kelowna one, but it looked like a lot of fun and challenging. I can remember years ago there was something along these lines in Penticton, but the comparison to this is night and day because there is so much more to do on our parks,” said Gallagher. “It is so beautiful in Penticton and people spend a lot of time at the beach. Many people feel they need an expensive boat, wakeboards or a pontoon boat to enjoy the water. I think the Wibit provides a more economical way to enjoy the water and allows everyone to get out there and have a fun experience.”

The Wibit Water Park has set up its anchors in the water and Gallagher believes they will be ready for the June 20 opening, if not earlier.

“We think Penticton will be a great fit for us. There is lots of space and there is some nice development happening along the lakeshore and we will fit right in. The City of Penticton has been really great in getting behind us and helping us get in operation,” said Gallagher. “I think once people see the park up and running it will speak for itself.”

While he admits the course can be challenging, even for the fittest people, there are easier obstacles. Parents or guardians are recommended to accompany children between the ages of five to seven and will not be charged the park pass fee. Lifejackets are required for all park users and are provided. Two lifeguards are stationed on the course and two on the shore during park hours. Admission costs will range between $15 and $25 per person.