‘You’re sitting on a jewel, Revelstoke’: Wilderness society proposes new park

Amber Peters is a biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. She gave a presentation this week at the Community Centre in Revelstoke on the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness as part of CRED (Columbia Region Ecological Discussions) Talks, a series addressing a diversity of science topics. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)Amber Peters is a biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. She gave a presentation this week at the Community Centre in Revelstoke on the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness as part of CRED (Columbia Region Ecological Discussions) Talks, a series addressing a diversity of science topics. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)
Peters said there is the risk of disturbance from visitation if the area becomes a park, but said that might be a worthwhile cost for protection. “Stand with me as a voice for these ancient ecosystems.” (Submitted)Peters said there is the risk of disturbance from visitation if the area becomes a park, but said that might be a worthwhile cost for protection. “Stand with me as a voice for these ancient ecosystems.” (Submitted)
The area is also rich in fungi, said Peters, as a biologist found more than 100 different species in only five hours of searching. “He was completely overwhelmed.” (Submitted)The area is also rich in fungi, said Peters, as a biologist found more than 100 different species in only five hours of searching. “He was completely overwhelmed.” (Submitted)
The 8,408 hectare proposal of Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness. (Submitted)The 8,408 hectare proposal of Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness. (Submitted)
The area has no roads. (Submitted)The area has no roads. (Submitted)
Only 17 per cent of inland temperate rain forest is currently protected and most of that does not include valley bottoms, which can harbour higher rates of biodiversity. (Submitted)Only 17 per cent of inland temperate rain forest is currently protected and most of that does not include valley bottoms, which can harbour higher rates of biodiversity. (Submitted)
Some trees said Peters are more than three metres wide and up to 2,000 years old. (Submitted)Some trees said Peters are more than three metres wide and up to 2,000 years old. (Submitted)
Peters said preliminary studies of the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness show more than 360 different species, including a lichen that is new to B.C. (Submitted)Peters said preliminary studies of the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness show more than 360 different species, including a lichen that is new to B.C. (Submitted)
(Submitted)(Submitted)
“We have waited 20 years to find this,” said Anne Sherrod, member of the Valhalla Wilderness Society. (Submitted)“We have waited 20 years to find this,” said Anne Sherrod, member of the Valhalla Wilderness Society. (Submitted)
Biologist Wayne McCrory said the discovery of Western Toads and Pacific Chorus Frog suggests the area is a locally important breeding area for both species. (Submitted)Biologist Wayne McCrory said the discovery of Western Toads and Pacific Chorus Frog suggests the area is a locally important breeding area for both species. (Submitted)
The Rainbow Valley (Submitted)The Rainbow Valley (Submitted)
(Submitted)(Submitted)
“It’s an unknown wilderness area,” said Amber Peters, biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. The 8,408 hectare proposal of Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness encompasses Frisby Creek and the Rainbow Valley on the west side of Lake Revelstoke. (Submitted)“It’s an unknown wilderness area,” said Amber Peters, biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. The 8,408 hectare proposal of Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness encompasses Frisby Creek and the Rainbow Valley on the west side of Lake Revelstoke. (Submitted)
Preliminary studies of the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness show more than 360 different species. (Submitted)Preliminary studies of the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness show more than 360 different species. (Submitted)
There were thought to be only three major intact biodiversity hot spots of ancient inland rain forest remaining: Robson Valley, Quesnel Lake Wilderness and another in the Selkirk mountains. (Submitted)There were thought to be only three major intact biodiversity hot spots of ancient inland rain forest remaining: Robson Valley, Quesnel Lake Wilderness and another in the Selkirk mountains. (Submitted)

A non-profit society is proposing a new provincial park north of Revelstoke.

The 8,408 hectare Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness encompasses significant tracts of ancient inland rain forest.

“It’s an unknown wilderness area,” said Amber Peters, biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. Peters gave a talk earlier this month at the Community Centre in Revelstoke about the proposal.

Peters said there were thought to be only three major intact biodiversity hot spots of ancient inland rain forest remaining in B.C., including the Robson Valley, Quesnel Lake Wilderness and another in the Selkirk mountains.

Amber Peters is a biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. She gave a presentation this week at the Community Centre in Revelstoke on the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness as part of CRED (Columbia Region Ecological Discussions) Talks, a series addressing a diversity of science topics. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

In 2017, the society was alerted to another north of Revelstoke, which included Frisby Creek and the Rainbow Valley on the west side of Lake Revelstoke.

They launched an expedition in 2018 and Peters said they found “an incredibly biodiverse ecosystem,” with trees more than three metres wide and up to 2,000 years old.

“We have waited 20 years to find this,” said Anne Sherrod, member of the Valhalla Wilderness Society.

“You’re sitting on a jewel, Revelstoke.”

Peters said the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness harbours some of the richest inland temperate rain forest found in the province, making the unroaded and unlogged wilderness a valuable refuge for wildlife and plants.

According to Parks Canada, B.C. has one of the world’s only temperate inland rain forest, all of which is found in the Columbia Mountains. The forest is notoriously wet, owing its moisture to weather systems that come from the Pacific Ocean and rise over the Columbia Mountains. They are similar in composition and structure to coastal rain forests, which are predominantly old growth.

READ MORE: Saving toads: researcher says we have to act quickly

The 8,408 hectare proposal of Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness. (Submitted)

Only 17 per cent of inland temperate rain forest is currently protected and most of that does not include valley bottoms, which is important habitat.

Peters said preliminary studies of the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness show more than 360 different species, including a lichen that is new to B.C. More than 20 rare species were also found, but in large colonies, such as smokers lung lichen.

Peters said lichen is important as they are indicators of an ecosystem’s health.

The area is also rich in fungi. A biologist found more than 100 different species after only five hours of searching.

“He was completely overwhelmed,” said Peters.

The society submitted the proposal to the provincial government last spring, along with two others, including the Quesnel Lake Wilderness and the Selkirk Mountain Caribou Park Proposal, which is a 156,461-hectare area on the south end of Glacier National Park.

READ MORE: ‘Every forest tells a story’: CRED Talks return to Revelstoke

The government did not respond in time to Black Press on the statuses of each proposal.

“We are not seeing any movement on the creation of new major protected areas,” said Peters.

“This is a crisis. We have lost almost all of our ancient ecosystems.”

While the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness area does not have logging cuts, surrounding areas do.

The lichen Methuselah’s beard is abundant in the Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness, however Peters said the species is usually found in coastal rainforest and has only been found in two locations inland. (Submitted)

Peters said the area is at risk for future industrial development as BC Timber Sales does have a forest tenure in the region. According to the society, roughly 25 per cent of the proposed park is currently designated by the province for no-logging due to mountain caribou.

The Frisby-Boulder mountain caribou herd borders the proposed park. The provincial government estimates their numbers at 11 animals and said the herd is at high risk of extinction.

READ MORE: Revelstoke Snowmobile Club writes letters requesting consultation on caribou closures

If the area becomes a park, there is the risk of disturbance from visitation, said Peters, but it might be a worthwhile cost for protection.

“Stand with me as a voice for these ancient ecosystems.”


 

@pointypeak701
liam.harrap@revelstokereview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Penticton Overdose Prevention Society co-founders Desiree Franz, Shane Surowski and Stephanie Lines have created the city’s first unsanctioned public overdose prevention site using an old wine-tour bus. The site began operations in June 2021. (Desiree Franz/Facebook)
Volunteers launch Penticton’s first public supervised injection site

2021 is on pace to be the deadliest year for overdoses in Penticton on record

Owner Daren McWhinney is really excited about the new location of Angry Vegan which just opened up at 536 Main Street. (Monique Tamminga Western News)
Penticton’s Main Street turns into foodie heaven

Angry Vegan, Wild Ginger, Twisted Chopsticks and Gratify recently opened

Four golfers from Fairview Mountain Golf Club in Oliver will golf from sunrise to sunset to raise funds for ALS on June 29. (Submitted)
Golfing from sunrise to sunset in Oliver for ALS

Four golfers from Fairview Mountain Golf Club have taken up the challenge June 29

Jann Arden will embark on Canada-wide tour Spring 2022 with a stop in Penticton at the South Okanagan Events Centre on June 13. (Contributed)
Jann Arden coming to Penticton in 2022

The Jann Arden Live! tour has been rescheduled for 2022

A storm watch has been issued for the Okanagan, Kootenays and Columbia regions of B.C. (Calvin Dickson photo)
Another severe thunderstorm watch issued for the Okanagan

Conditions are favourable for thunderstorms that may produce strong wind gusts, hail and heavy rain

Singer-songwriter Jann Arden is pictured with a draft horse. (Canadian Horse Defence Coalition)
Jann Arden backs petition to stop live horse export

June 14 is the International Day to End Live Export of Animals

Montreal Canadiens goaltender Carey Price (31) is scored on by Vegas Golden Knights defenseman Alec Martinez, not pictured, during the second period in Game 1 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup semifinal playoff series Monday, June 14, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Habs fall 4-1 to Vegas Golden Knights in Game 1 of NHL semifinal series

Match was Montreal’s first game outside of Canada in 2021

(Dave Ogilvie photo)
One injured after being pinned by fallen forklift near Peachland

West Kelowna emergency crews responded to reports of a person stuck under a forklift

Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick, assistant deputy speaker at the B.C. legislature, presides over committee discussions. The legislature is completing its delayed spring session this week, with most MLAs participating by video conference. (Hansard TV)
B.C.’s daily COVID-19 infections dip below 100 over weekend

Only 68 new cases recorded Monday, four additional deaths

B.C. ambulance station in Revelstoke is expected to get a new system called the Scheduled On-Call (SOC) this fall. (Liam Harrap - Revelstoke Review)
B.C. ambulance changes could put Revelstoke residents at risk, warn local paramedics

Paramedics said to expect a substantial increase in ambulance response time starting this fall

This goose family went for a leisurely stroll down Vernon’s Main Street Saturday, April 25. (Dave Deshane photo)
Controversial Vernon goose cull won’t fly this year

Necessary permit procedures held up at a federal level

Mounties cover a burgundy truck with a tent at Buckerfields in West Kelowna on Monday, June 14. The RCMP is investigating after a woman’s body was found inside the truck. (Amandalina Letterio/Capital News)
West Kelowna RCMP investigating suspicious death after body found in truck

Police responded to a truck parked out front of a Main Street business where the body was found

The BC Ferries website went down for a short while Monday morning following a provincial announcement that recreational travel between health authorities can resume Tuesday. (Black Press Media file photo)
BC Ferries’ website crashes in wake of provincial reopening announcement

Website back up now, recreational travel between health regions to resume as of Tuesday

The Kamloops Indian Residential School is photographed using a drone in Kamloops, B.C., Monday, June, 14, 2021. The remains of 215 children were discovered buried near the former school earlier this month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Communities grapple with what to do with former residential and day schools

Some tear them down as a tool to help healing, others repurpose them as tools for moving forward

Most Read