Youth addiction centre near Keremeos celebrates one year

Ashnola at the Crossing has been open just over a year

Since March 2017 more than 80 youth and young adults with substance use and mental health challenges have received treatment at Ashnola at The Crossing outside Keremeos.

A one-year anniversary to celebrate the re-opening of the facility under new operators occurred Friday.

The 22-bed facility provides care in a therapeutic environment for 17 – 24 year olds with substance use challenges that require specialized treatment and supports.

The facility was previously operated by Quebec-based Portage but closed abruptly in March 2015. At the time lack of qualified staff and budgetary concerns were cited as reasons.

The treatment centre was closed for about two years as a new operator was chosen and new treatment parameters developed.

Related: Province cancels lease for addiction facility

“The overdose crisis has made it clear that we need to provide a full spectrum of connected treatment and recovery options for people with substance use challenges,” said Judy Darcy, Minister of Mental Health and Addictions. “Ashnola at The Crossing has brought together local First Nations, Indigenous organizations and many other local organizations as partners to create a safe space for youth to focus on a pathway to hope and recovery.”

BC Mental Health & Substance Use Services, part of the Provincial Health Services Authority (PHSA), oversees the new program in collaboration with the Ministry of Health. The program is operated by Pacific Community Resources Society and began accepting the first clients on May 22, 2017. Central City Foundation, which built and owns the facility, provides The Crossing buildings and rural site to PHSA rent-free.

“Ashnola at The Crossing provides highly-specialized, evidence-based treatment, education and support for youth who are at a critical stage in their life path,” said Lynn Pelletier, vice-president, BC Mental Health & Substance Use Services. “It’s a unique setting with strong connections to the region and the local community where young people can get the support they need.”

Related: Housing crunch impacts staffing levels at provincial addiction centre near Keremeos

To access the program, youth and young adults need to be referred through their regional health authority. Priority access is given to Indigenous youth and youth from rural and remote communities. The program works with youth and their families to develop individualized treatment plans.

“Central City Foundation built The Crossing to be a residential treatment program to help youth with addictions,” said Jennifer Johnstone, president and CEO, Central City Foundation. “The Foundation and its donors and partners are thrilled to celebrate the successful first year of the new program.”

Programming includes group, individual and family therapy, therapeutic recreational activities, life-skills training, high school completion, psycho-social education and planning and support for clients to return to the community. Staff and clinicians provide support that is sensitive to the impacts of past trauma and encourage participants to recognize their strengths and build resilience.

“We are delighted to celebrate this milestone with our valued partners,” said Ingrid Kastens, chief executive officer, PCRS. “We are deeply aware that young people and their families trust us to deliver meaningful, high-quality services as our participants courageously take their next steps with us. We take this responsibility very seriously, and will do all we can to support young people on their healing journeys.”

Just Posted

South Okanagan man honoured with lifetime achievement award

The late Nick Bevanda to receive a lifetime achievement award for his architecture work

South Okanagan dangerous offender guilty plea struck down

Trial delayed again because Ronald Teneycke failed to elect his choice of trial

South Okanagan-West Kootenay candidates talk climate change and environment at recent forum

Forum on Tuesday grilled candidates about plan to bring about low carbon emission economy

Ellis Creek restoration comes with $30 million price tag for Penticton

Residents are able to provide feedback on the restoration plan until Nov. 1

City of Penticton weighs need for a manager of social development

Members of council are divided on whether the position is necessary

Competition shakes up for the Okanagan Mixoff

The Okanagan Mixoff takes place Nov. 7 in Kelowna

Fatal overdoses down by 33% in B.C., but carfentanil deaths continue to spike

Carfentanil, an illicit drug more powerful than fentanyl, causing more deaths than ever

Six bears destroyed in three days in West Kelowna

A West Kelowna business has been charged for leaving garbage around Lake Okanagan Resort

West Kelowna Warriors being sold back to BC Hockey League

Current owner Kim Dobranski said the sale back to the BCHL should be completed by the end of October

Police standoff ends peacefully in West Kelowna

A distraught man was taken into custody Wednesday afternoon

A year after pot legalization in Canada, it’s a slow roll

It’s one year into Canada’s experiment in legal marijuana, and hundreds of legal pot shops have opened

ELECTION 2019: Climate strikes push environment to top of mind for federal leaders

Black Press Media presents a three-part series on three big election issues

Most Read