Creating a concrete jungle

Some 35 years ago I recommended that parking lots be landscaped and permeable paving be explored instead of hard surfacing which requires costly storm water drainage.

Some 35 years ago I recommended that parking lots be landscaped and permeable paving be explored instead of hard surfacing which requires costly storm water drainage.

Over the years green parking lots have evolved and become established in various American cities and are actively being explored in Toronto, Victoria and Calgary.

Green parking lots are economically sound while they also make social, esthetic and environmental sense. They provide protection from the elements, reduce the urban heat island effect and reduce pollution to the air, soil and water and lower the carbon footprint.

It took some time but finally some landscaping was introduced to a few city parking lots.

It is quite obvious that the only green city council cherishes is the green from our money, paying for exorbitant taxes, water and electricity rates.

Council has become dulled and immune to esthetics, witnessing the despicable, decrepit parking lot behind city hall.

Instead of setting an example to improve our environment, council has gone one step further by approving gravel parking lots on vacant development sites for a three-year period with an option to renew. Council should have ruled that vacant development sites be cleared up and not become eyesores.

Another step to downgrade our environment will be the approval of other party advertising signs not related to the premises.

One wonders if council has become blinded and only see the gleam of money, or have they become influenced by all the signs at the entrance of the City of Kelowna when they go there?

When passing Pen High and looking at the vast expanse of the bare hard surface parking lot in front of the school it makes me think about the typical Wal-Mart layout at various places.

It certainly doesn’t instill a sense of enhancing our environment and making the city attractive. A recent survey in Kelowna revealed that their citizens feel strongly about trees and promote tree-lined streets for city scapes. Do we want a concrete and gravel jungle in Penticton?

John Cornelissen

 

Penticton