Drivers’ education needed

Living with disabilities has enough challenges, without having to try to defend yourself against a 3,000-pound hunk of metal

Because of health issues, I use a motorized wheelchair to get around in. I have had to use it for the past two years, and will for the rest of my life.

Because of the many accidents that seem to happen from vehicle driver inattention, I replaced the red pennant with a medium-large skull and crossbones flag. It has a black background with a white skull wearing a bright red “doo-rag”, with white crossed bones behind it. Quite noticeable you’d think?

Apparently not.

Within the last four weeks I have had close encounters with vehicles whilst I was travelling in the pedestrian-controlled crosswalk, crossing Skaha either to Wal-Mart or Cherry Lane shopping centre.

Twice a vehicle turned left directly across my path while I was crossing with an illuminated walk signal, causing me to stop rapidly. Twice a vehicle attempted a right hand turn as I was entering the crosswalk with an illuminated walk signal.

Had I not been vigilant in making eye contact, and yelling and waving my hands, I swear that I would have been hit by at least two of these drivers.

They weren’t all seniors. There was a cross-section of ages and sexes. I would say it represented a fair demographic of drivers. It would be so nice if these people could refresh their memory of driving rules regarding pedestrians in illuminated crosswalks, not to mention paying attention to their surroundings.

Living with disabilities has enough challenges, without having to try to defend yourself against a 3,000-pound hunk of metal with an incompetent person in control of it.

Lois Linds

 

Penticton