Editorial: Put down the pitchforks

It has been a long year-and-a-half that the Skaha Lake Park controversy has divided the community.

It has been a long year-and-a-half that the Skaha Lake Park controversy has divided the community.

In the end, those opposed to developing the green space in the park won out. In response to major changes in the agreements with Trio Marine Group, the Save Skaha Park Society  gracefully discontinued their civil suit.

The new agreements remove any mention of commercial development, and limit any expansion beyond the marina to a boathouse concession amenity, and no net loss of green space.

It’s unlikely anybody would say the agreements are ideal. But short of paying out a large sum of money to Trio, and considering the various pressures, they are the best that could reasonably be hoped for.

There is still, as the SSPS says, a need to be vigilant and keep an eye on the actions of council. Even in the best of times, that isn’t a bad attitude to take.

But there is still a civil suit out there trying to bring down the agreements between Trio and the city, based on an interpretation of  legal details the agreement is based on.

We feel this pursuit of minutiae is prolonging the fight with no good end. Though the situation bears watching, the immediate battle has been won.

Progress needs to happen, though not at any cost — especially the loss of parkland. In the end, the city still needs to upgrade Skaha Marina and the Trio deal is the best way to accomplish that without adding another charge onto Penticton’s looming infrastructure deficit. If not Trio, it would have to be another partner.

It’s time to put down the pitchforks, end the civil suit and let city hall get on with the business of running the city — under the watchful eye of citizens who are hopefully more aware of their part in the process.