Editorial: Whose province is it anyway?

Time for B.C. to get a seat at the big kids’ table

There are manifold issues around the building of the Trans Mountain pipeline through B.C., but there is one that doesn’t seem to get discussed much.

Whose province is this? The federal government may have jurisdiction over certain areas, though when it comes to expensive ongoing items like health care and education, the feds aren’t all that involved. But the pipeline promises to pour quite a few dollars into federal coffers.

Alberta, of course, has no business forcing anything on B.C., though they stand to profit mightily from the pipeline.

This isn’t a question of whether a pipeline is a good or bad thing. The bitumen is going to pass through B.C. one way or another, as it is now, making its way to our ports for sale to the world market, and making rich multinational oil companies even richer, along with the Alberta and federal governments.

With the current B.C. government attempting to block the pipeline, the other parties involved have moved on to threats and intimidation: blocking transfer payments, boycotting wine and so on.

Wouldn’t it be better if all parties sat down instead and negotiated a deal that included B.C. as an equal partner? This province bears the greatest risk of environmental damage, on land and in our coastal waters, while realizing the least profit from the pipeline.

There is also the question of keeping profit in Canada. Instead of allowing this oil to be shipped overseas to be refined elsewhere, why not insist that it be refined in this province first at a new refinery, as B.C. businessman David Black (also the owner of this paper) has advocated for.

Shipping lighter fuel products would reduce the risk of environmental damage as well as keeping more jobs, and profit, in province.

But regardless of whether you are pro-pipeline or a protestor, moving forward because of threats and intimidation from other governments is no way to work.

Just Posted

South Okanagan community taking action on fire prevention

Community working to prevent a repeat of last summer’s wildfire

In today’s Okanagan flood water, a reflection of 67-year-old history

In 1951, floods north of Oliver led to the government blowing out the highway to relieve pressure

Role of bylaw is ever-changing

Bylaw department faces variety of challenges

Grants for seniors housing project in Okanagan Falls

The move means other organizations who regularly get the grants may be left scrambling

Open letter to Premier John Horgan

LETTER: Group called First Things First Okanagan promotes action on climate change

Lt.-Gov. Guichon believes she made the right decision in last B.C. election

Outgoing Lt.-Gov Judith Guichon said her most memorable moments weren’t surrounding the election

NAFTA: Talks continue through weekend in scramble to get a deal

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland called negotiations ‘perpetual’

Pulp mill fined $900,000 for leaking effluent into B.C. lake

Mackenzie Pulp Mill pleaded guilty to depositing deleterious substance into water frequented by fish

B.C.’s 2-year lobbying ban starts May 1

Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists can grant exemptions from the prohibition if public interest

Horgan speaks of government’s successes to ‘friends’ at CUPE BC convention

CUPE BC president Paul Faoro said was first time a B.C. premier addressed convention in some time

Speed Skating Canada fires coach Michael Crowe after investigation

Crowe was a coach on the American team from 1983 to 1991 and again from 1999 to 2006

5 things to know about the ongoing influx of asylum seekers in Canada

Number of illegal border crossings are up this year – as RCMP, military, politicians try to combat

Salmon Arm RCMP arrest one male on child pornography charges

Search of Canoe residence leads to seizure of computers

Most Read