HST a fair tax

As previously stated, I don’t believe anyone agrees with the manner in which the HST was implemented; however, this is a fait accompli and is now a moot point. If the upcoming vote is based on only the emotional aspect of the HST, we are heading for trouble.

As previously stated, I don’t believe anyone agrees with the manner in which the HST was implemented; however, this is a fait accompli and is now a moot point. If the upcoming vote is based on only the emotional aspect of the HST, we are heading for trouble.

No one can deny that our infrastructure, health and social services, schooling, employment, and almost all aspects of our daily lives have deteriorated.

The problem is: how can this be fixed? It takes money. Where do the various governments get the money to fund the activities that society requires?

Taxes. A necessary and logical conclusion. If this is not so, I wish someone would show me an alternative.

One may object to the HST/PST/GST, etc. but one must be realistic. The various levels of government have a choice to either (a) raise personal income taxes or (b) implement other taxes.

No matter how you cut it, the HST is a consumer tax, just as were the PST and GST.

It is a much fairer tax than increasing personal income taxes. The HST is going to primarily tax the more affluent members of our society — the more disposable income one has, the more one spends, and the more HST one pays.

Simple and straightforward. No doubt that the wealthy don’t support the HST, and certain leaders are playing on the emotions of the everyday citizen — the rest is just smoke and mirrors.

The GST is also a consumer tax and is fair. When PM Harper promised to cut the GST to five per cent, I wrote to my MP strongly suggesting that the GST not be reduced and that it was fair in that the more affluent contributed accordingly.

I received a response to the effect “Why should the wealthy pay more?” If the GST had remained at seven per cent, this country would not be in this mess and significant funding could have been distributed to the provinces.

Mr. Harper’s policy of tax breaks for the wealthy and big business is self-serving and does not work in the interest of the everyday Joe, let alone Canada, but he can do anything he wants to hold onto power, given the PC majority. Time will tell.

In British Columbia, we now have a chance to benefit our business community and ensure that the richer members of our province pay for luxury items accordingly.

I will be voting No in the HST referendum. This means that I favour the HST. Is that confusing or what?

Patrick MacDonald

Penticton