LETTERS: Obvious reasons for a national park overlooked

With increasing strains being placed on our biosphere we can no longer afford this pervasive short-sighted “me-first” attitude.

Regarding this ongoing National Park debate — I find it highly distressing that the obvious reasons for the park proposal have been largely overlooked and obscured with a lot of me-my-mine-we-us blather and self-serving arguments.

Parks Canada did not simply decide its location by throwing a dart at a map. It was identified as one of the top four most endangered ecosystems with the greatest diversity of ecosystems and most species at risk (over 250 ) of any national park in all of Canada.

To claim that our provincial government, with it’s diminished budget-cut resources and manpower, can adequately protect this area is, at best, laughable.  And further to claim, as one writer did, that recreational users and clubs are the “natural caretakers of the land” is as far off the mark as was Dick Cheney’s gunsights.

Adequate proof (beyond bullet riddled signage) historically abounds. Stinky Lake (Oliver) — trashed; Spring Lake (Peachland) — trashed; Garnet Valley wetlands — trashed; the Aberdeen, Greystoke and Monashee areas (Okanagan Life article by Don Elzer) — trashed. The number of yearly forest fires caused by human negligence are huge, and more recently, the out-of-season killing of a pregnant doe (Penticton)  and the killing of 16 eagles (Kootenay).

There are ample numbers of eco-morons out there that put a lie to provincial and recreational users claims. As an older outdoor enthusiast I could fill this page with abuses that I have witnessed or experienced.

A national park is the best and most viable option to protect and preserve this jewel of deserving lands period. Why else then are so many of our national parks internationally recognized as World Heritage sites?

Nor can it be said that Parks Canada cannot be fair and accommodating. It has a demonstrated record of respecting and accommodating native concerns (Gwaii Haanas N.P.), involving ranchers (Grasslands N.P.) and even allowing some commercial interests.

With the ever-increasing strains being placed on our life sustaining biosphere we can no longer afford this pervasive short-sighted “me-first” attitude.  We owe this to both nature and to all those who will follow us.

Over 250 species at risk in an area unique within the entire breadth of Canada deserve our positive commitment and sacrifices.

There is a quote that I believe is most appropriate:

“One can complain that rosebushes have thorns or rejoice because thorn-bushes have roses.”

Jeff Bedard

Penticton

 

 

Just Posted

Penticton Art Gallery auction ranges from the iconic to the obscure

The Penticton Art Gallery is holding it’s largest fundraiser of the year June 28.

Severe thunderstorm watch issued for the Okanagan

Possible rainfall rates of up to 25 milimetres in one hour.

Firefighters flipping for funds

The annual Penticton firefighters pancake breakfast Saturday and Sunday

Dragon boat sprinters make a splash

Annual dragon boat sprint races on Skaha Lake

Pinns U15 boys off to provincials

After a slow start to the season Pinns U15 boys rebound in a big way

VIDEO: B.C.’s ‘unicycle cowboy’ aspires to be rancher one day

Burklan Johnson has only ridden a horse once, but this unicyclist has big plans to become a cowboy.

Trudeau in nothern B.C. to announce pledge to protect oceans

Prime minister announces conservation agreement with 14 First Nations

FIFA World Cup weekly roundup

Host nation Russia remains unbeaten in Group A, tied with Uruguay

Star Gazing: Using a large telescope

Ken Tapping, astronomer with the National Research Council’s Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory

Trudeau says he can’t imagine Trump damaging U.S. by imposing auto tariffs

New tariffs on Canadian autos entering the U.S. would amount to a self-inflicted wound on the U.S. economy

B.C. inmate gets 2 years in prison for assault on guard

Union rep said inmate sucker punched correctional officer, continued assault after officer fell

Temperature records broken across B.C., again

The first heat wave of the season went out with a bang across the province

Canada’s first national accessibility law tabled in Ottawa

The introduction of the Accessible Canada Act marked a key step towards greater inclusion

Most Read