Legacies that go beyond the Games

A legacy is a footprint we leave, marking our journey from the past and helping lead the next generation to the future. In order to leave lasting legacies in B.C. communities well beyond the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, 2010 Legacies Now, a not-for-profit organization, is working with over 4,000 organizations and groups across the province.

  • Thu Feb 11th, 2010 1:00pm
  • Sports

Celebrity visitor — Penticton’s torch bearer Susie Welch visited Giant’s Head Elementary’s StrongStart Centre on Feb. 8. Families enjoyed being able to touch the torch and had their own torch parade with torches made of paper rolls.

A legacy is a footprint we leave, marking our journey from the past and helping lead the next generation to the future. In order to leave lasting legacies in B.C. communities well beyond the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, 2010 Legacies Now, a not-for-profit organization, is working with over 4,000 organizations and groups across the province.

Here is a small sample of lasting legacies 2010 Legacies Now has helped create:

In the Cariboo region everyone can experience nature, whether they’re walking, in a wheelchair, using a scooter, or on a bike, with the creation of a fully accessible trail through the Tatlayoko Lake community park. The two-kilometre trail was made from recycled rubber conveyor belts, donated by a local mining company, which create a smooth path so people of all abilities can use the trail without worrying about tripping or stumbling.

This project was made possible thanks to Measuring Up, a program funded by the Province of B.C., which helps communities assess and improve local accessibility and inclusion for persons with disabilities and others. From increasing accessible employment opportunities and offering inclusive community services, to installing automatic doors and ramps, Measuring Up is helping B.C. communities engage people with disabilities in community planning and programming like never before.

In Vancouver, with the help of the Catalyst arts grant program, four theatre groups formed a central operations hub, enabling them to reduce expenses and improve production. Boca del Lupo, Electric Company Theatre, Neworld Theatre and Rumble Productions used funding from Catalyst to develop a new operations plan, which led to a shared working space called Progress Lab 1422 (PL 1422). This former East Vancouver garment factory was converted into a 7,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art rehearsal and office space and storage facility, and has allowed for more collaboration to take place.