This whimsical bronze sculpture is called Joy of Life Unbalanced, a tribute to the vertically challenged Dachshunds who are joyfully happy jumpers, said artist-creator Joanne Helm of Saanich. Find this art along with five others along Lakeshore Drive. (Submitted)

This whimsical bronze sculpture is called Joy of Life Unbalanced, a tribute to the vertically challenged Dachshunds who are joyfully happy jumpers, said artist-creator Joanne Helm of Saanich. Find this art along with five others along Lakeshore Drive. (Submitted)

Take a sculpture walk along Penticton’s lakeshore

Seven new art pieces installed just in time for the long weekend

Today, there’s even more to love about Penticton’s Okanagan Lake beachfront than the sun and sand!

Seven new public art sculptures have been installed along Lakeshore Drive, with one in the roundabout at Front Street.

With pandemic protocols in place, the Penticton Public Sculpture Exhibition kicked off virtually, with access to a walking app in place of a traditional walking tour.

“There’s no denying that the COVID-19 pandemic has continued to push us to adapt and try new means of providing arts and culture to the residents of Penticton,” says Kelsey Johnson, Penticton city manager of recreation, arts & culture. “We are delighted to have the opportunity to see this program continue and expand with the addition of another art piece to view along the walkway.”

The sculptures are owned by the artist and leased by the city.

The most prominent sculpture along the Lakeshore Drive promenade can be found near the SS Sicamous paddlewheeler. This is where the Raven’s Key was displayed previously.

The new sculpture is called Quantum Entanglement by sand and ice sculptor David Ducharme of Winlaw, B.C., depicting a man-beast caught between two worlds.

Another prominent sculpture just down the way is Joy of Life Unbalanced, a tribute to the vertically challenged dachshunds who are joyfully happy jumpers, said artist-creator Joanne Helm of Saanich.

The towering female scuba diver Lost, found in the Front Street roundabout for the last year has been removed. It found a new home overlooking Okanagan Lake.

The new sculpture at the roundabout is called Mourning by Revelstoke artist Kyle Thomley. It depicts 15 species that have gone extinct over the last 30 years.

Penticton’s year-long sculpture exhibition first began in 2016. This year’s exhibit showcases artists from around British Columbia and Alberta and will be on display from through April 2022.

“During the past year with the pandemic, we have realized now more than ever, the importance of providing arts and culture to our community. Council and I are happy to see this program be able to continue, virtually, and see the addition of another sculpture along Lakeshore Drive to expand residents’ cultural experience,” says Mayor John Vassilaki.

Residents can use the virtual walking app and learn more about the sculpture program, including art pieces from past years, by visiting www.penticton.ca/publicart.

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