(Natalia Cuevas-Huaico - Kelowna Capital News)

(Natalia Cuevas-Huaico - Kelowna Capital News)

Morning Start: Our sharpest memories are from early adulthood

Your morning start for Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020

Good morning, today a winner has yet to be projected in the U.S. Presidential Race. Follow the election results here.

Fun Fact of the day: Our sharpest memories are from early adulthood

Called “the reminiscence bump,” this psychological concept holds that as adults reflect on events of their lives, they remember more events from their twenties than from any other time in their lives. According to psychologist Dan McAdams, this phenomenon grows out of the fact that this period of one’s life is important in shaping one’s identity or “life story.”

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In case you missed it:Honey’ and ‘sweetie’ possibly sexual harassment in Okanagan hair salon

A former Lake Country hairstylist can move forward with a sex discrimination claim she filed after a co-worker called her “hun, honey and sweetie,” according to a recent decision by the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal.

Brigette Hollett launched the case against Valentina’s Hair Studio and her former boss, Cecilia Burtch, after a male co-worker looked at her and referred to her “inappropriately” in June 2017.

The Tribunal’s decision, released Oct. 30, refers to the male coworker in question as M.

Hollett alleges she was sexually harassed by M, who called her “hun” on her first day of work at the salon. She was made to feel uncomfortable again the next day when he called her “honey and “sweetie” and looked at her buttocks.

The hair studio applied to have the case dismissed on the grounds that M referred to everyone as “honey” and “sweetie,” with no one else taking offence. However, the Tribunal said that argument missed the point, because the focus of the claim is on the effect the words had on Hollett.

“Ms. Hollett does not have to prove M intended to discriminate against her. The focus of human rights law is on discriminatory impact, not discriminatory intent,” reads the decision, which ultimately denied the hair salon’s application to have the case dismissed.

Song of the Day: Microwave – Dull

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READ MORE:Interior Health declares COVID-19 outbreak at Kelowna seniors’ care home


Daniel Taylor
Reporter, Kelowna Capital News
Email me at daniel.taylor@kelownacapnews.com
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