CULTURAL DANCE Dancers with Rescue Cambodia perform a traditional dance during a performance in Summerland. The dancers are on tour throughout Canada and parts of the United State until the end of October. (John Arendt/Summerland Review)

Cambodian dancers perform on Canadian tour

Young dancers from Rescue Cambodia visiting communities throughout North America this fall

Young dancers from an orphanage in Cambodia performed traditional and modern dances in Summerland during a North American tour.

The team of dancers from Rescue Cambodia were at Summerland Alliance Church on Sept. 12 as a part of their tour.

The show is titled The Jouney: A Tale of Hope. There are 16 dancers and four support people on tour.

In 2003, Marie Ens, a retired Canadian missionary to Cambodia founded Rescue Cambodia to help those affected by the AIDS crisis.

At that time, up to three per cent of the population of Cambodia was affected. To provide help, 10 orphan homes were built, housing 100 children.

This year, Rescue Cambodia has 544 children, adults coping with AIDS and grandparents in its care.

“In principle, we don’t receive the children just because they’re poor,” Ens said. “We receive them because their mothers have died.”

Ens, now 84, continues to operate Rescue Cambodia. She is the only non-Cambodian with the organization.

Many of the dances are traditional or cultural dances from Cambodia. These include a traditional blessing dance and dances featuring themes of fishing, the praying mantis, coconut shells and the traditional krama scarf.

Also included is a country line dance, with the dancers wearing plaid shirts and cowboy hats, and dancing to a song by Canadian country musician Paul Brandt.

The line dance was first performed several years ago as a one-time experiment, but it was so well received that the dancers now include a line dance number every year.

But Ens said the orphanage works to keep a Cambodian cultural focus.

“We want our children to be proud that they’re Cambodian,” she said. “We don’t want them to wish they were western.”

The dancers are performing at communities throughout Canada and parts of the United States until the end of October.

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

One-day-a-year open house for Okanagan raptor rehab centre on May 5

The 31st annual open house for SORCO Raptor Rehab Centre is May 5

Witnesses say body found at Kelowna’s Gyro Beach

Police tape is blocking part of the beach and several RCMp officers are on scene.

Okanagan-Shuswap weather: A sunny Easter Sunday

Temperatures will peak at approximately 20C region-wide

Children gather for Easter festival in Summerland

Fourth annual Easter Egg-stravaganza included activities and egg hunt

Summerland student examines effects of sound

Science fair project will go to national competition in New Brunswick

‘No answers:’ Canadians react to Sri Lanka bombings that killed hundreds

The co-ordinated bomb attacks killed at least 207 people and injured 450 more on Easter Sunday

Pets still missing after Peachland home fire

Two Pomeranians and two cats are missing after fire

Regional district backs more consultation on plans to help caribou

It is feared that the caribou recovery plans could result in closure of backcountry areas

Okanagan student shows skill at provincial finals

Aidan Eglin of Armstrong won website development event at Skills Canada’s B.C. finals in Abbotsford

Kootnekoff: Easter Bunny legal woes

Several years ago, our young daughter needed to know: “Is Santa Claus… Continue reading

Okanagan fire department rescues kittens

Enderby homeowner not aware cats were in wood pile in yard near garbage pile fire that got away

Okanagan township’s open burning winds down

Spallumcheen reminds residents of regulation changes as open burning concludes April 30

Most Read