The Children’s Showcase invited Axis Theatre to present in the Cleland Community Theatre, one of many venues and organizations that MP Richard Cannings wished he could have recognized in his statement on the House of Commons floor. (Brennan Phillips - Western News)

The Children’s Showcase invited Axis Theatre to present in the Cleland Community Theatre, one of many venues and organizations that MP Richard Cannings wished he could have recognized in his statement on the House of Commons floor. (Brennan Phillips - Western News)

City and culture on track to pre-pandemic return in Penticton

Use of fields, community centre and theatre are looking positive for 2022

The city is moving ahead steadily on this year’s projects and moving towards pre-pandemic service for the city’s arts and culture centres.

Six of the city’s projects have faced delays according to the city’s corporate business plan update for the third quarter while. However, 13 have been completed and 28 remain on track to be completed on schedule.

The six delayed projects include updates to the city’s Development Cost Charges bylaw, implementing the city’s Assets Management Software, the continued delay of evaluation for the diesel peak shaving project, Ironman Canada and other such events that were delayed this year, an update to the city’s soil mapping and evaluation of the Emergency Management Program.

Most of the delayed projects are still expected to be completed by the end of the year, with exceptions for the DCC bylaw and the peak shaving project that is expected to have a second set of testing over November and December after the initial testing was skewed due to the summer heatwave.

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According to the Penticton Restart update to council, outside of Cleland Theatre, which is still facing Interior Health’s capacity restrictions, the city has almost reached pre-pandemic service levels across the board.

The city’s sports’ fields, McLaren Arena, Penticton Museum and Archives, Community Centre and the city’s recreation programs have all described as at or near pre-pandemic levels, with the city’s parks under preparation for festivals and events at pre-pandemic levels in 2022.

The Community Centre currently has over 6,300 active memberships and 6,237 hours for sports were booked at the community’s sports’ fields and baseball diamonds.

For 2022, the city is expecting to conservatively build back towards pre-pandemic levels of revenue, with Cleland Theatre expected to break even between six live music performances in 2022 and upgrades to the theatre’s equipment.

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Arts and cultureMunicipal Government