City casts gaze skyward

Eyes glued to the live video stream of the man she loves dangling precariously outside of the International Space Station, Patricia Tribe admitted her emotions ran the gamut.

Eyes glued to the live video stream of the man she loves dangling precariously outside of the International Space Station, Patricia Tribe admitted her emotions ran the gamut.

“You really do feel a little bit of everything, but it is fantastic and right now I’m just bursting with pride,” said the Penticton woman Monday after her boyfriend and mission specialist Col. Alvin Drew and Discovery crew member Steve Bowen completed their nearly seven-hour spacewalk. “He (Drew) emailed to say he was in safe and sound but I can just tell by the sound of his voice (on video) he’s having such a good time. 

“This was a very exhausting day for everyone, but now the first EVA (extra-vehicular activity) is done with one more (Wednesday). That’s the most dangerous part out of the way, and then they just have to land.”

Discovery will deliver and install equipment and critical spare components to the station. 

It is the 35th shuttle mission to the station and the last for Discovery.

Today’s walk for Drew, who has now become the 200th person to do so, is from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Part of that time Tribe will be at KVR Middle School talking with students about the mission.

She will also be at the Peach on Lakeshore Drive Wednesday night for a viewing (weather permitting) as the conjoined spacecraft pass over the city at about 6:24 p.m.

Penticton Parks and Recreation is hoping to have as many people as possible attend.

Tribe recalled seeing the brightly-lit object Monday night.

“The clouds parted and there was the space station zipping across the sky. It was as clear as a bell right smack over top of us. It’s kind of cool to see this little thing and know there’s people up there looking down at you, especially someone you know.”

To see live television coverage of the mission go to www.nasa.gov/ntv  and for additional times to view the station log onto www.spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings.