Group nursing abused horses back to health

Theresa Nolet traces the rib bones with her hands as she strokes Arundel’s side, it is evidence of the tough life the 22-year-old once had.

Critteraid Project Equus spokesperson Theresa Nolet gives some attention to one of the six horses they rescued from slaughter in Kamloops. The horse is now available for adoption.

Critteraid Project Equus spokesperson Theresa Nolet gives some attention to one of the six horses they rescued from slaughter in Kamloops. The horse is now available for adoption.



Theresa Nolet traces the rib bones with her hands as she strokes Arundel’s side, it is evidence of the tough life the 22-year-old once had.

Saved by Critteraid’s Project Equus, in conjunction with the provincial government, this horse was one of six the local animal rescue group saved from slaughter. Arundel is being nursed back to health and is looking for a good home.

“She was in the worst condition of all,” said Nolet, spokesperson for the Critteraid Project Equus, “We immediately started to treat her for ticks and there was not a square inch on her body that did not have a tick on it.”

Arundel also appeared to have a halter on her face for too long which caused some change in her bone structure on her face. She arrived at her foster ranch in Kaleden on Sunday after spending time with another volunteer trainer as she recovered.

Arundel, along with the other five rescued horses, were headed to auction after being rounded up near Kamloops in Deadman’s Valley.

Critteraid stepped in after concerned citizens brought the feral horse problem to light. After making applications to help with the Ministry of Natural Resource Operations, they were accepted. Now they are looking to help find a long-term solution to save any future feral horses from going to slaughter when rounded up.

While it has always been a long-term goal in the Critteraid not-for-profit organization to be able to rescue horses, it is not a cheap venture. Critteraid experiences considerable costs associated with transportation, medical care, sheltering care and training. It is through the help of volunteers like Amy Sutherland that makes Project Equus possible.

“I have always been interested in helping and felt I could take on a foster horse at this time,” said Sutherland, who is taking care of Arundel until she is adopted out.

While some of the six horses are still being trained, Arundel has been doing so well in getting back to health she soon will start to be socialized.

“I was quite surprised how quiet she was already. I was expecting a little bit more of a nervous horse from the fact that she was on the range … within five minutes of being here she was down rolling in the sand, which if a horse is not comfortable they are not going to lay down,” said Sutherland.

They believe Arundel would be a great horse for someone with kids or someone who can give her lots of attention. Sutherland said the horse loves to stand and be groomed and it is believed she is saddle broke.

Anyone interested in adopting Arundel can contact Nolet at 250-497-6733 or 250-492-4921 or by email at jardinantiques@yahoo.com. Those interested in supporting Project Equus or Critteraid can make a tax-deductible donation online at www.critteraid.org.