Princeton not ready to talk pot

Municipalities grappling with how to prepare for marijuana sales

The Town of Princeton isn’t ready to start talking about pot.

While the issue is being raised increasingly in BC municipalities – in advance of marijuana being made legal to purchase on July 1, 2018 – council is not ready to commit to any plan, said Deputy Mayor Doug Pateman.

Mayor Frank Armitage was not available to comment on the issue.

“We are going to wait and see what the province rolls out, see what their guidelines are. We really can’t come forward until we have the rules and regulations, especially around taxation, and what it really looks like,” said Pateman in an interview with The Spotlight.

Last week the district council in Peachland gave three readings to a bylaw prohibiting the sale of cannabis products in the district.

That bylaw is intended as a preventative measure to keep retail shops from opening, said Peachland CAO Elsie Lemke.

“We’ve banned it everywhere in the community. Once the legislation is in place then we will put the zoning in place so we can permit it in the areas of town that the community sees as the right place to put it,” she told Black Press.

The issue has yet to be discussed at Princeton town council, however at its January 15 meeting a letter addressing marijuana taxation was received as information from the City of West Kelowna.

The letter stated that “the impact may affect policing, fire services, communications, law, etc. City of West Kelowna Mayor and Council is requesting your support, by writing to the province to lobby them to agree to 50 per cent of the provincial share of cannabis tax sharing formula to be provided to local governments. This is an adequate and equitable share to help support costs and services incurred by local governments.”

Pateman said so far he has only been approached by one resident in the community, asking about the local policy for selling marijuana.

“Myself, and I think council as a whole, we are not being closed minded or anything. We are keeping an open mind but we really can’t come out with any opinion yet.”

In December the provincial government announced the structure of its model for rolling out legalization.

Recreational pot will be sold in both public and privately owned stores, and the Liquor Distribution Branch will oversee distribution. The legal age for purchase will be 19.

Just Posted

Fun and games, medieval style

more fun than watching the royal wedding

Caravan Farm Theatre fundraiser embraces outlaw spirit

The third annual Hands Up! Live Auction Fundraisder is June 2

Reel Reviews: Atypical college life

We say, “Life of the Party is pleasant and harmless.”

Tigers clawing the competition

Penticton Tigers continue their winning ways with four more victories.

Bike to Work and School rolls into 2018

Cycling event starts on May 28

A good day for a grind

Summerland’s Giant’s Head Grind now in fifth year

UPDATED: Majority of flood evacuees in Kootenay-Boundary allowed to return home

Officials hope to have all 3,000 people back in their homes by Monday night

The Okanagan shines in foodie finalist list

Western Living has released their 2018 list of finalists

B.C. VIEWS: Making sense of climate policy

Flood and fire predictions have poor track record so far

In Photos: Trooper attracts a crowd on Shuswap Lake

Hundreds of boats turn up to watch the Canadian rockers play atop a 94 foot houseboat

Chilliwack Chiefs make history with first RBC Cup win

In front of a huge and noisy crowd, the Chiefs claimed their first-ever national junior A title.

VIDEO: As floodwaters recede, crews assess the damage to Grand Forks’ downtown

More than four dozen firefighters and building inspectors came out to help

Vacationers urged to check for stowaway bats that could carry deadly disease

‘White-nose syndrome’ has killed millions of bats in North America, but hasn’t arrived in B.C. yet

Most Read