Strict conditions sought for South Okanagan sex offender

Strict conditions are being sought for a convicted sex offender living in Okanagan Falls.

An application has been put forward by Crown counsel to seek stricter restrictions on convicted sex offender Ronald Teneycke who is currently living in Okanagan Falls.

An application has been put forward by Crown counsel to seek stricter restrictions on convicted sex offender Ronald Teneycke who is currently living in Okanagan Falls.

Strict conditions are being sought for a convicted sex offender living in Okanagan Falls.

Crown counsel has put forward an application for Ronald Teneycke to live under what is called a Section 810.2. order.

“The application is made on the basis that there are alleged to be reasonable grounds to fear the person will commit a serious personal injury offence, in a general explanation that covers a number of sexual offences as well as certain other violent offences where there is a maximum penalty of 10 years or more,” said crown spokesperson Neil Mackenzie.

While not able to get into the specifics of the application, Mackenzie said Section 810.2 of the criminal code is intended to provide a means of putting some controls or restrictions on the persons behaviour in the community.

According to parole documents, Teneycke was labelled as a high risk to reoffend when he was released from the Prince Albert Federal Corrections Institution in 2007 and moved to the South Okanagan. He spent 12 years behind bars, eight of them for sexual assault with a weapon, forcible confinement and uttering threats against a 17-year-old Okanagan Falls girl in 1993. While in a B.C. jail, a probation officer reported Teneycke’s girlfriend was a correctional officer in the same facility. Teneycke threatened the probation officer’s life in remarks made to another inmate and was convicted of uttering threats and received another four year sentence.

Teneycke had only been out of jail for a week, from a conviction of sexual exploitation committed against a former partner’s 16-year-old daughter, when he picked up the 17-year-old Okanagan Falls girl at a local gas station and drove her to a secluded area. Parole documents said he “brutalized and tortured” the teen for five hours.

Just two months after moving back to the Okanagan in 2007, Teneycke was sent back to jail for a six-month stint for breaching his probation twice. At the time Teneycke said he was living in a “fish bowl atmosphere” and this pressure from the community caused him to return to drug use.

He turned himself in to an Oliver health centre seeking treatment for the effects he was suffering due to cocaine use. His second breach was failing to show his medical doctor a list of release conditions as ordered.

A probation report at the time described Teneycke’s willingness to participate in programs and outlined steps that he was taking to change his life, but two years later Teneycke was back in jail for breaking his probation order and racking up new charges. He pled guilty to three counts of uttering threats, dangerous driving and fleeing a peace officer and was sentenced to 14 months and 90 days for breaching.

The charges stem from an incident that started when Oliver/Osoyoos RCMP officers attended Teneycke’s residence in Gallagher Lake to investigate a report of threats after he got into an argument with a man from whom he purchased a truck.

Teneycke failed to comply with the arrest and fled in his vehicle and a high-speed chase ensued, in which he evaded police. The next morning Teneycke turned himself in to Oliver RCMP.

In 2011, Teneycke was acquitted of a sexual assault alleged to have happened on a logging road in Okanagan Falls against a hitchhiker he picked near the Penticton airport.

In a trial by judge alone, Justice James WIlliams said he was left with reasonable doubt because there was not enough evidence for a conviction, but he “strongly suspects” the incident unfolded as the complainant testified to.

Teneycke is scheduled to appear in court for the Section 810.2 application on Wednesday at the Penticton courthouse. If he does not willingly consent to the application a hearing will be held so Teneycke can speak to the matter.

Under Section 810.2, the conditions can only be applied to the person for a maximum of two years. Once that expires another application can be made and hearing held to decide if the conditions should continue.

A person convicted for a breach of their Section 810.2 conditions can receive up to two years in jail.