Sue Chaudry an early childhood educator with the OSNS Child and Youth Development Centre helps two of the centre’s children in the Valley First Teaching Kitchen. Submitted photo

Valley First Endowment grant helps OSNS in 2017

The grant for the OSNS teaching kitchen just one of the ways First West helps communities.

Healthy eating habits make for happy learners and thanks to Valley First, kids and parents of the OSNS Child and Youth Development Centre are a little better off.

That’s because through a more than $5,000 grant from the First West Foundation, through its Valley First Endowment Centre, the money was used to complete and better equip the innovative Valley First Teaching Kitchen Project at the centre.

That was just one of 13 grants totalling $108,260 the foundation distributed throughout the Okanagan, Similkameen and Thomson regions in 2017.

Related:Penticton Eagles help lift OSNS

In total First West gave 100 grants in the amount of $673,258 in all four of its regions.

“Through these grants, we’re able to make a real difference in the lives of people in our communities,” said Susan Byrom, executive director of the First West Foundation in a news release. “By helping local organizations get the funding they need, we ensure they can continue to deliver the programs and services that make our communities a better place to live.”

Valley First is a division of First West.

The OSNS teaching kitchen began last year to help children, especially those with developmental challenges, establish a healthy relationship with nutritious food.

It also includes a parent education component to help them learn how to feed children who may have specific dietary and sensory challenges.

“Making sure that children enjoy healthy foods and that parents know how to provide healthy foods is a developmental game changer,” said OSNS Executive Director Manisha Willms. “Good nutrition and proper sleep are foundation pieces to successful learning. We are so grateful for the Valley First Teaching Kitchen Project”.

 

Just Posted

Smoke cancels Super League Penticton, organizers give pros a gift

Super League Penticton organizers decide to send all pro competitors to championship

Smoky skies means stay inside, according to Interior Health

The air quality in the Okanagan is considered a high risk

UPDATED: Super League organizers cancel remaining races

Smoke still remains too thick for athletes in inaugural North American triathlon

Air support grounded as fires fill the skies with smoke

Heavy smoke throughout the region thwarted efforts of BC Wildfire Saturday, as… Continue reading

Smokey skies don’t dampen spirits at Between the Lakes Pow Wow

Annual Between the Lakes Pow Wow celebrations for the children

Meet Your Farmer: Ambercott Acres

This week, a look at the permaculture Ambercott Acres farm, from Cawston, BC

Flights from Kelowna International Airport affected by wildfire smoke

Passengers are being asked to check their flight’s status before arriving

Work continues on Monashee Complex wildfires

Crews will be assisted by helicopters if flying conditions improve

Fast food chains look to capitalize on vegetarian, vegan trend with new items

Seven per cent of Canadians consider themselves vegetarians and 2.3 per cent identify as vegans

Gottfriedsen Mountain wildfire continues to be held

Firefighters are working alongside the military to extinguish the wildfire near West Kelowna

B.C. swimmer halts journey across Strait of Juan de Fuca after hypothermia sets in

Victoria MS athlete Susan Simmons swam for eight-and-a-half hours in 9 C choppy waters

‘Hard on water:’ Smoke not the only long-range effect of wildfires

The project began more than 10 years ago after southern Alberta’s 2003 Lost Creek fire

B.C. VIEWS: Genuine aboriginal rights can be misused and discredited

Camp Cloud one of long line of protests falsely asserting title

Most Read