EDITORIAL: A national embarrassment

Alberta’s ban on the sale of B.C. wines in that province heightens tensions and creates animosity

Although Alberta’s ban on the sale of B.C. wines in that province is over, the dispute between the two provinces remains a national embarrassment.

Because of British Columbia’s position on the Kinder Morgan pipeline, Alberta premier Rachel Notley stopped the import of all B.C. wines into Alberta.

The B.C. government has said it would restrict increased shipments of bitumen while it continues to study the effectiveness of spill response and cleanup.

The wine embargo was lifted last Thursday, but it should not have been imposed in the first place.

Whatever anyone thinks of the B.C. government’s position on the pipeline, stopping the movement of B.C. wines into Alberta did not address the issue. Instead, it served to heighten tensions and create a spirit of animosity between the two provinces.

And it has set a dangerous precedent for provincial governments.

If Alberta was able to stop the movement of B.C. wines because of a trade dispute, would it be possible for British Columbia to halt the import of Alberta beef? Could another interprovincial dispute result in a province banning the sale of Quebec maple syrup or automobiles manufactured in Ontario?

Such questions may appear ridiculous, but if one provincial government can impose an embargo, what is to prevent others from similar actions?

Interprovincial sanctions benefit nobody. They only serve to weaken trade ties between provinces and weaken the Canadian economy.

Producers lose income, consumers lose the choices they once enjoyed and governments imposing such measures appear petty and childish.

Whatever differences exist between provinces, these need to be handled through proper legal and governmental channels. Otherwise, Canada’s reputation on the world stage will be that of a country riddled with internal strife.

If this country is to have a strong role internationally, there is no room for petty moves such as interprovincial trade embargoes.

Just Posted

Over 60 cats and kittens surrendered to the South Okanagan-Similkameen SPCA

The surrender is part of an ongoing animal cruelty investigation with BC SPCA Special Constable

Man sentenced for fatal Christmas Eve collision near Penticton

Crown said they could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that man was impaired

South Okanagan Indo-Canadian pledge for hospital expansion recieves large boost

Jaswinder Garib has donated $30,000 to the $500,000 pledge

COLUMN: From pot to policing

I am sure the cannabis legalization on Oct 17 will be the number one issue on everyone’s minds

LocoLanding flowers bring joy to others in Penticton

LocoLanding Amusement Park sends flowers to Penticton residents

B.C. RCMP turn to Const. Scarecrow to shock speeders into slowing down

New addition will watch over drivers from a Coquitlam median for first-of-its-kind pilot in Canada

Who’s running in Penticton’s election?

Candidates for the Penticton municipal and school board election

Canadian air force short 275 pilots

Attrition outpaces recruitment and training claims Air Force

Teacher suspended after physically shushing, saying ‘shut up’ to student

Grade 5 student reported feeling ‘confused and a little scared’

High spirits after first week of classes at Shuswap’s outdoor school

South Canoe School is taking student learning into the great outdoors

A B.C. society helps to reforest Crown land after wildfires

Forest Enhancement Society of BC focuses on wildfire mitigation and the reforestation

B.C. marijuana workers may face U.S. border scrutiny

Cannabis still illegal federally south of the border

Symphony giants launch 59th Okanagan Symphony Orchestra season

Concerts in Kelowna, Penticton, Vernon Sept. 21-23

New political party holds an informational session in Vernon

Maxime Bernier’s The People’s Party of Canada draws about 2o interested patrons to Vernon pub.

Most Read