Send your letter to the editor via email to news@summerlandreview.com. Please included your first and last name, address, and phone number.

Send your letter to the editor via email to news@summerlandreview.com. Please included your first and last name, address, and phone number.

LETTER: Proposed development too close to Penticton landfill

Health concerns raised about proposed Canadian Horizons development

Dear Editor:

Canadian Horizons, a development company out of Surrey, is proposing to develop a high-density community next to Penticton’s Campbell Mountain landfill.

It is well documented that living next to a landfill poses a variety of health risks, including exposure to different gases that may result in inflammation and bronchoconstriction, affect immune cells, and act as irritants to mucosa membrane and the upper respiratory tract which causes cough, chest tightness and breathlessness.

Studies also link these gases to different cancers and chronic diseases such as COPD and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Other risks associated with living next to landfills include dust, noise, odour, rodents, pollution, and scavengers.

I’m not a scientist or in the medical field, but I am a concerned citizen of Penticton. It didn’t take long to research and find several studies on the negative health risks of living near a landfill.

READ ALSO: Penticton Indian Band opposes Canadian Horizons development

READ ALSO: Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen seeks input about proposed composting facility

I would strongly discourage my children and grandchildren from moving into a development next to a landfill. Canadian Horizons has proposed a 300 meter buffer zone separating the landfill site from the community, but in my opinion, this isn’t nearly enough space considering what’s at risk.

The B.C. government requires that a new landfill must have a minimum buffer zone of 500 meters between any residential areas. Shouldn’t this also apply when developing a new community?

Then there is the question of liability. Who will be left holding the proverbial bag should any of the residents’ health be negatively impacted or the value of their property reduced?

Canadian Horizons are suggesting that they will “have an instrument registered on the title of the lots to be created acknowledging that the lots are adjacent to an active industrial landfill operation and that nuisances may occur from time to time,” thereby removing Canadian Horizons of any liability.

This means that the City of Penticton and the taxpayers may be held liable.

Citizens place their trust in the City of Penticton and count on the city to perform their due diligence and protect the health and wellbeing of their citizens.

That perspective needs to be supported by both industry and politicians looking to our future well-being.

I encourage the City of Penticton to protect their residents’ health and bottom line through responsible and appropriate development. https://www.change.org/p/city-of-penticton-listen-to-the-residents-of-penticton-and-respect-the-vision-and-ocp

Deb Barry

Penticton

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