Possible solution to cat problem

Re: Gladys Kusnack’s “catty letter” (June 22, Western News). Mr. Handfield’s column (June 10, Western News) referred to controlled studies in the U.S. showing horrific cat predation on birds there, which he extrapolated to birds here. It wasn’t just one study (denigrated by her quotation marks) as Ms. Kusmack implies.

Re: Gladys Kusnack’s “catty letter” (June 22, Western News).

Mr. Handfield’s column (June 10, Western News) referred to controlled studies in the U.S. showing horrific cat predation on birds there, which he extrapolated to birds here. It wasn’t just one study (denigrated by her quotation marks) as Ms. Kusmack implies.

If runaway development, poisons, etc. kill birds, then there is all the more reason to do what we can to protect them in whatever ways we can. As for habitat destruction, I have a huge yard, very green in all ways, backing onto bush, so it can provide habitat (apparently for bears and deer, too). Running water is available nearby, but the birds come to my yard for the plants, bugs and worms.

Living in such a civilized jungle, with no sprays or other poisons, makes it even sadder to find a small ripped-off wing one week, a tiny head the next, and for what? Surely the cats aren’t starving or likely even hungry.

A possible solution, scientifically proven, is a “cat bib” which doesn’t inhibit cat movements, but flips during pre-pounce, thus warning small prey. (SPCA magazine, Animal Sense, Spring/Summer 2011)

Joy Lang

 

Penticton